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WSU News Genomics and Bioinformatics

Toxic effects of mercury persists for generations

PULLMAN, Wash. – Zebrafish exposed to very low levels of methylmercury as embryos not only passed on toxic effects of the chemical exposure to their offspring, but also to the third generation, according to a study that investigated both epigenetic changes – chemical modifications to the DNA – and abnormal neuro-behavior associated with exposure. » More …

Cyber gene network could speed up discoveries

Seth Truscott, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

PULLMAN, Wash. – A Washington State University team has set out to digitally model how every known gene interacts with every other gene – in plants, animals, insects and people. » More …

New course prepares students for personalized medicine

By Lori Maricle, College of Pharmacy

SPOKANE, Wash. – Using a patients’ individual genetic information to select drugs and drug dosages specifically effective for them is part of pharmacy’s future. A recent study of a new course in pharmacogenomics at Washington State University Spokane found the class expanded students’ understanding of these possibilities for their profession. » More …

WSU helps map quinoa genome, improve ‘super food’

By Seth Truscott, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

PULLMAN, Wash. – Discovery of the first high-quality genome of quinoa, published this week in Nature, could help create healthier, tastier varieties of this protein-packed “super food.” » More …

Sperm changes documented years after chemotherapy

By Eric Sorensen, WSU science writer

PULLMAN, Wash. – A Washington State University researcher has documented epigenetic changes in the sperm of men who underwent chemotherapy in their teens. » More …

Undergraduate researchers win national awards

undergrad-research-winners

By Beverly Makhani, Undergraduate Education

PULLMAN, Wash. – Three Washington State University undergraduates won national awards and cash prizes recently for outstanding presentations at the 2016 Annual Biomedical Research Conference for Minority Students (ABRCMS) in Tampa, Fla. » More …

Novel gene resists toxic wheat disease that costs billions

fusarium-inoculation-web
While a student in 2002, WSU’s Mike Pumphrey inoculates wheat with Fusarium spores before measuring the plants’ resistance.

PULLMAN, Wash. – Scientists at Washington State University and Kansas State University have isolated and cloned a gene that provides resistance to Fusarium head blight, or wheat scab, a crippling disease that caused $7.6 billion in losses in U.S. wheat fields between 1993 and 2001. » More …

Fat in feces points to early presence of colorectal cancer

By Rebecca Phillips, University Communications

Hill-80PULLMAN, Wash. – Scientists at Washington State University and Johns Hopkins Medical School have discovered a fast, noninvasive method that could lead to the early diagnosis of colorectal cancer. » More …

WSU scientists collaborate on ‘gene therapy in a box’

Trobridge-80SPOKANE, Wash. – Washington State University Spokane researchers have collaborated on a tabletop device that can genetically manipulate blood to treat cancer, HIV and other diseases without expensive processing facilities.  » More …

WSU portable smartphone laboratory detects cancer

By Erik Gomez, Voiland College of Engineering & Architecture intern

spectometer-device-webPULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University researchers have developed a low-cost, portable laboratory on a smartphone that can analyze several samples at once to catch a cancer biomarker, producing lab quality results. » More …