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Epigenetics study helps focus search for autism risk factors
January 16, 2018

By Judith Van Dongen, WSU Spokane Office of Research

SPOKANE, Wash. – Scientists have long tried to pin down the causes of autism spectrum disorder. Recent studies have expanded the search for genetic links from identifying genes toward epigenetics, the study of factors that control gene expression and looks at chemical modifications of DNA and the proteins associated with it.

White House honors two for science teaching innovation
October 17, 2016

griesar-and-leakeVANCOUVER, Wash. – A unique arts-integrated approach to neuroscience education was presented last week at the White House Frontiers conference by Bill Griesar, instructor and outreach coordinator, and Jeff Leake, outreach coordinator, both with the College of Arts and Sciences at Washington State University Vancouver.

Targeted drug makes alcohol guzzling mouse a teetotaler
August 30, 2016

By Eric Sorensen, WSU science writer

David-RossiPULLMAN, Wash. – A Washington State University researcher has found a mechanism that strongly influences whether or not an animal is likely to drink a lot of alcohol.

WSU searches for brain drugs to fight ALS, Alzheimer’s, more
March 16, 2016

By Lori Maricle, College of Pharmacy

travis-dentonSPOKANE, Wash. – Repairing the brain’s “house-cleaning function,” which could help people with Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and 100 other diseases, is the focus of recently funded research at Washington State University.

Researcher’s love of molecules is good for society too
February 11, 2016

By Alyssa Patrick, Office of Economic Development

SorgVANCOUVER, Wash. – Barbara Sorg studied functions of the brain for years before she saw the tiny nets in her microscope that made her heart skip a beat.

Ask Dr. Universe: Can you hear in space?
January 19, 2016

Dr-Universe-230VANCOUVER, Wash. – Your question reminds me of an experiment: You put a ringing alarm clock in a jar and use a hose to slowly suck out all the air. As the air escapes, the ringing gets quieter until there’s no sound at all.

Ask Dr. Universe: When do children’s brains work best?
March 2, 2015

Dr-Universe-230PULLMAN, Wash. – Hang on tight because the human brain keeps you on a 24-hour roller coaster. Every day the human body produces a chemical messenger in the brain called melatonin. It tells the body when it is time to go to bed.