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WSU News Michael Skinner

Toxic effects of mercury persists for generations

PULLMAN, Wash. – Zebrafish exposed to very low levels of methylmercury as embryos not only passed on toxic effects of the chemical exposure to their offspring, but also to the third generation, according to a study that investigated both epigenetic changes – chemical modifications to the DNA – and abnormal neuro-behavior associated with exposure. » More …

Sperm changes documented years after chemotherapy

By Eric Sorensen, WSU science writer

PULLMAN, Wash. – A Washington State University researcher has documented epigenetic changes in the sperm of men who underwent chemotherapy in their teens. » More …

Shifting the genetic paradigm with epigenetics

From the American Association for the Advancement of Science

Michael-SkinnerPULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University biologist Michael Skinner isn’t one to shy away from a good fight. In fact, prominently displayed on his webpage are the words: “If you are not doing something controversial, you are not doing something important.” » More …

Environment link may be ‘major finding’

Everyone has something that keeps them going. For Michael Skinner, director for the Center for Reproductive Biology at WSU, those things are a basic curiosity and a drive to find the answers to questions.Over the past couple of years, Skinner and his research team discovered a direct link between environmental exposures and human reproductive health. In essence, this research suggests that a toxicant your great-grandmother was exposed to could affect your health without changing the genes themselves.“If verified, this discovery could be on the level of the discovery of how genes work — a major finding in biology,” said Michael Griswold, dean of the College … » More …