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WSU News

Program lets donors help feed hungry students

By Steve Nakata, Administrative Services

PULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University students who run out of food money will not have to go hungry thanks to a new donor-funded program called Cougs Feeding Cougs. WSU believes it could be a model for universities nationwide. » More …

Business advising equips autism practice for rapid growth

By Hope Belli Tinney, Washington SBDC

TUKWILA, Wash. – Takanori Koyama’s clinical practice for children with autism spectrum disorder was growing so quickly that in two years his one-person staff burgeoned to 24 and he needed more space. » More …

Flash of spring couldn’t undo January’s bitter cold

January 2017 was a monster of a cold month. (Disney photo from “Frozen”)

By Nic Loyd, WSU meteorologist, and Linda Weiford, WSU news

SPOKANE, Wash. – Remember the stint of unseasonably warm weather that triggered the Big Melt in mid-January? It wasn’t enough to offset the month’s brutal cold that encased the Inland Northwest. » More …

WSU helps map quinoa genome, improve ‘super food’

By Seth Truscott, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

PULLMAN, Wash. – Discovery of the first high-quality genome of quinoa, published this week in Nature, could help create healthier, tastier varieties of this protein-packed “super food.” » More …

WSU research highlights deforestation threat to jaguars

By Will Ferguson, College of Arts & Sciences

PULLMAN, Wash. – Accelerating deforestation of jaguar habitat, especially in corridors connecting conservation areas, threatens the long-term survival of the iconic predator, according to new research by Dan Thornton, an assistant professor in the Washington State University School of the Environment. » More …

Ask Dr. Universe: Why do nonbiodegradables decay slowly?

PULLMAN, Wash. – It can take a really long time for some things to decay. If we buried an apple peel in the backyard, it might only take a few weeks to break down into the soil. But if we buried a plastic water bottle, it would probably still be there hundreds of years from now. » More …

WSU Tri-Cities spring enrollment soars 21 percent

By Jeffrey Dennison, WSU Tri-Cities

RICHLAND, Wash. – Washington State University Tri-Cities spring enrollment increased by approximately 21 percent from last spring, according to official numbers released Friday. Enrolled students, including undergraduate, transfer and graduate students, total 1,825. » More …