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WSU News genome

WSU helps map quinoa genome, improve ‘super food’

By Seth Truscott, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

PULLMAN, Wash. – Discovery of the first high-quality genome of quinoa, published this week in Nature, could help create healthier, tastier varieties of this protein-packed “super food.” » More …

‘Big data’ leads to better trees via $3 million grant

By Seth Truscott, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

Dorrie-Main-webPULLMAN, Wash. – Scientists at Washington State University are harnessing the power of “big data” to help growers create the next generation of healthy, sustainable forests and tree crops. » More …

WSU geneticist helps solve mystery of Arctic peoples

By Eric Sorensen, WSU science writer

omar cornejoPULLMAN, Wash. – With help from a Washington State University population geneticist, Danish researchers have concluded that North America and the Arctic were settled in at least three pulses of migration from Siberia. First came the ancestors of today’s Native Americans, then Paleo-Eskimos – the first to settle in the Arctic – followed by the ancestors of today’s Inuit. » More …

Researcher sees survival story in fly’s small genome

By Eric Sorensen, WSU science writer

KelleyPULLMAN, Wash. – Few animals can boast of being as tough as the Antarctic midge. Its larvae develop over not one but two Antarctic winters, losing nearly half their body mass each time. It endures high winds, salt and intense ultraviolet radiation. As an adult, the midge gets by without wings and lives for only a week or so before starting the life cycle all over again. » More …

International team sequences rainbow trout genome

By Eric Sorensen, WSU science writer

thorgaard-80PULLMAN, Wash. – Using fish bred at Washington State University, an international team of researchers has mapped the genetic profile of the rainbow trout, a versatile salmonid whose relatively recent genetic history opens a window into how vertebrates evolve. » More …

Nature: Ancient child’s genome sheds light on colonization

Anzick-location-80PULLMAN, Wash. – Mapping the genome of a child from the Clovis period has shown his family is the direct ancestor of roughly 80 percent of present day Native Americans, according to a paper published today in the journal Nature (http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v506/n7487/full/nature13025.html). » More …

Researchers strive for next dimension

With completion of the human genome project, researchers know a lot about our genetic makeup. How that translates into action in our bodies in the form of proteins is the next frontier of understanding. In the field of proteomics, however, researchers are limited by separation techniques. Blood, for instance, is thought to contain more than 50,000 proteins. Researchers would like to better understand the function of these proteins, which may be indicators of disease known as biomarkers, but they can only separate out about 2,500 proteins at a time using gel electrophoresis. Neil Ivory and Prashanta Dutta recently received an initial $200,000 National Science Foundation … » More …