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WSU News water quality

Research addresses health impacts of contaminated water

WSU Vancouver graduate student Stephanie Gardiner, second from right, and an RN from the Holy Innocents Children’s Hospital in Mbarara, right, visit with patients in a field clinic in Kakoma, Uganda.

From Northwest Crimson & Gray, WSU Vancouver

VANCOUVER, Wash. – Helping get a hospital built in Uganda was an important step for Anita Hunter. But it was just the first step. » More …

Jan. 27-29: Helping neighborhoods adapt to climate change

SAN FRANCISCO – Five public, community workshops to help some San Francisco neighborhoods adapt to sea level rising, flooding and drought will be hosted by the Washington State University Adaptive Water Urbanism Initiative Jan. 27-29. » More …

Soybean nitrogen breakthrough could help feed the world

By Will Ferguson, College of Arts & Sciences

mechthild-tegederPULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University biologist Mechthild Tegeder has developed a way to dramatically increase the yield and quality of soybeans. » More …

Oct. 18: Workshop on water quality, rights for landowners

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By Kate Ryan, WSU Extension

EVERETT, Wash. – Water quality, quantity and rights information for landowners will be presented at the workshop “H2O-Managing Your Water Resources” 5:30-8:30 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 18, in the Washington State University Snohomish County Extension Cougar Auditorium, 600 128th St. SE, Everett. » More …

New grant to help cities make better water decisions

xianming-shi

By Erik Gomez, Voiland College of Engineering & Architecture intern

PULLMAN, Wash. – A Washington State University researcher has received a $2.5 million National Science Foundation grant to develop a statistical model that will help city managers make more informed sustainable water decisions. » More …

WSU studies pollution potential of industrial nanomaterials

By Michelle Fredrickson, Voiland College of Engineering & Architecture

chowdhuryPULLMAN, Wash. – Nanoscale materials are helping provide new and better products for society, but researchers know little about what happens when these materials break down in the environment. » More …

Human activities harm water quality, raise treatment costs

By Eric Sorensen, WSU science writer

Julie-PadowskiPULLMAN, Wash. – Julie Padowski, clinical assistant professor at Washington State University, has found that the loss of land cover around cities has increased pollution and raised the cost of water treatment. » More …

Annual drinking water quality report available online

waterdrop80pPULLMAN, Wash. – The 2015 Washington State University drinking water quality report has been released by the university’s environmental health and safety department. The report summarizes the drinking water quality for the Pullman campus systems last year. » More …