Skip to main content Skip to navigation
WSU News epigenetics

Sperm changes documented years after chemotherapy

By Eric Sorensen, WSU science writer

PULLMAN, Wash. – A Washington State University researcher has documented epigenetic changes in the sperm of men who underwent chemotherapy in their teens. » More …

Shifting the genetic paradigm with epigenetics

From the American Association for the Advancement of Science

Michael-SkinnerPULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University biologist Michael Skinner isn’t one to shy away from a good fight. In fact, prominently displayed on his webpage are the words: “If you are not doing something controversial, you are not doing something important.” » More …

Study: Environmental epigenetics affects disease, evolution

By Eric Sorensen, WSU science writer

Skinner-Michael-2012-80PULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University researchers say environmental factors are having an underappreciated effect on the course of disease and evolution by prompting genetic mutations through epigenetics, a process by which genes are turned on and off independent of an organism’s DNA sequence. » More …

Study: How environment may have affected ancient societies

ancient-DNA-from-Photos-dot-comPULLMAN, Wash. – A new study in PLOS ONE shows for the first time that epigenetic marks on DNA can be detected in a large number of ancient human remains. This could improve understanding about the effects of famine and disease in the ancient world. » More …

Research finds female descendants susceptible to stress

ratsPULLMAN, Wash. – A new study by researchers from the University of Texas at Austin and Washington State University shows that male and female rats are affected differently by ancestral exposure to a common fungicide, vinclozolin. Female rats whose great-grandparents were exposed become much more vulnerable to stress. » More …

Pesticide linked to three generations of disease

By Becky Phillips, University Communications

SkinnerPULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University researchers say ancestral exposures to the pesticide methoxychlor may lead to adult onset kidney disease, ovarian disease and obesity in future generations. » More …

DNA ‘burrs’ discovery earns Smithsonian award

By Joanna Steward, College of Arts and Sciences

Skinner-80WASHINGTON – A simple mistake during an experiment into endocrine disruptors – chemicals known to interfere with fetal development – dramatically changed the direction of inquiry for one Washington State University researcher and led him to challenge the core biological principals of genetic inheritance. » More …