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WSU News epigenetics

Epigenetics study helps focus search for autism risk factors

By Judith Van Dongen, WSU Spokane Office of Research

Peixoto-Lucia_L asst professor biomedical sciences WSU Elson S. Floyd College of Medicine
Peixoto

SPOKANE, Wash. – Scientists have long tried to pin down the causes of autism spectrum disorder. Recent studies have expanded the search for genetic links from identifying genes toward epigenetics, the study of factors that control gene expression and looks at chemical modifications of DNA and the proteins associated with it. » More …

Sperm changes documented years after chemotherapy

By Eric Sorensen, WSU science writer

PULLMAN, Wash. – A Washington State University researcher has documented epigenetic changes in the sperm of men who underwent chemotherapy in their teens. » More …

Shifting the genetic paradigm with epigenetics

From the American Association for the Advancement of Science

Michael-SkinnerPULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University biologist Michael Skinner isn’t one to shy away from a good fight. In fact, prominently displayed on his webpage are the words: “If you are not doing something controversial, you are not doing something important.” » More …

Study: Environmental epigenetics affects disease, evolution

By Eric Sorensen, WSU science writer

Skinner-Michael-2012-80PULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University researchers say environmental factors are having an underappreciated effect on the course of disease and evolution by prompting genetic mutations through epigenetics, a process by which genes are turned on and off independent of an organism’s DNA sequence. » More …

Study: How environment may have affected ancient societies

ancient-DNA-from-Photos-dot-comPULLMAN, Wash. – A new study in PLOS ONE shows for the first time that epigenetic marks on DNA can be detected in a large number of ancient human remains. This could improve understanding about the effects of famine and disease in the ancient world. » More …

Research finds female descendants susceptible to stress

ratsPULLMAN, Wash. – A new study by researchers from the University of Texas at Austin and Washington State University shows that male and female rats are affected differently by ancestral exposure to a common fungicide, vinclozolin. Female rats whose great-grandparents were exposed become much more vulnerable to stress. » More …

Pesticide linked to three generations of disease

By Becky Phillips, University Communications

SkinnerPULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University researchers say ancestral exposures to the pesticide methoxychlor may lead to adult onset kidney disease, ovarian disease and obesity in future generations. » More …