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Cyber gene network could speed up discoveries
April 3, 2017

Seth Truscott, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

PULLMAN, Wash. – A Washington State University team has set out to digitally model how every known gene interacts with every other gene – in plants, animals, insects and people.

Novel gene resists toxic wheat disease that costs billions
November 2, 2016

PULLMAN, Wash. – Scientists at Washington State University and Kansas State University have isolated and cloned a gene that provides resistance to Fusarium head blight, or wheat scab, a crippling disease that caused $7.6 billion in losses in U.S. wheat fields between 1993 and 2001.

Licensing deal will help Genus combat deadly cattle disease
July 27, 2016

srikumaran-s-2010-80PULLMAN, Wash. – A gene editing technology developed at Washington State University is being licensed to Genus plc, a global animal genetics company, to develop cattle that are more resistant to bovine respiratory disease (BRD).

June 23: Gene sequencing tech presented to researchers
June 13, 2016

PULLMAN, Wash. – A free, one-day workshop about genetic sequencing technology and research will be presented by the Genomics Core at Washington State University Spokane on the Pullman campus and via video statewide.

Wheat gene discovery clears way for non-GMO breeding
September 15, 2014

By Eric Sorensen, WSU science writer

Gill-80PULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University researchers have found “the most famous wheat gene,” a reproductive traffic cop of sorts that can be used to transfer valuable genes from other plants to wheat.

Feb. 10: Skinner to discuss ‘ancestral ghosts’ in genes
January 21, 2014

By Jared Brickman, Honors College

Skinner-Michael-2012-80PULLMAN, Wash. – Your grandmother has some explaining to do. What she was exposed to during pregnancy could make you more susceptible to disease, and you’re going to pass that on to your grandchildren as well.

Researchers uncover secrets of destructive plant virus
December 19, 2013

By Kate Wilhite, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

Pappu,-80PULLMAN, Wash. – A Washington State University professor and a colleague from Australia have deciphered the inner workings of one of the world’s most destructive crop viruses.

Diet/gene breakthrough
February 2, 2007

Photo: John McNamara and Jennifer Sumner in WSU Pullman’s Knott Dairy Center. (Photo by Becky Phillips)In the first study to show that a specific nutrient could alter the expression of genes in the body fat of dairy cattle, John McNamara and Jennifer Sumner have raised the bar for animal production standards while adding to the greater understanding of human health issues.McNamara, professor in the Department of Animal Sciences and (intercollegiate, multidisciplinary) Nutrition Program, and Sumner, his doctoral student and postdoctoral research associate, have demonstrated that chromium in the diet changes the metabolism of body fat in dairy cattle by stimulating the expression of certain genes … » More …