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WSU News breeding

Cyber gene network could speed up discoveries

Seth Truscott, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

PULLMAN, Wash. – A Washington State University team has set out to digitally model how every known gene interacts with every other gene – in plants, animals, insects and people. » More …

June 25: Small Grains Field Day heralds new varieties

By Cathy McKenzie, WSU Mount Vernon

small-grainsMOUNT VERNON, Wash. – Color, flavor and aroma will highlight the free, public Small Grains Field Day 3-6 p.m. Thursday, June 25, at the Washington State University Mount Vernon Research Center, 16650 State Route 536 (Memorial Highway).

» More …

Wheat gene discovery clears way for non-GMO breeding

By Eric Sorensen, WSU science writer

Gill-80PULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University researchers have found “the most famous wheat gene,” a reproductive traffic cop of sorts that can be used to transfer valuable genes from other plants to wheat. » More …

WSU apple a non-biotech non-browning alternative

WA-38--175PULLMAN, Wash. – A genetically engineered apple that doesn’t brown after it is cut has received media attention recently. Meanwhile, Washington State University’s recently released apple variety, WA 38, also is extremely slow to brown – and it was developed with conventional breeding techniques used for millennia. » More …

WSU researchers preparing bee semen bank

 

Sheppard and Cobey discuss the challenges facing honey bees and the efforts to expand the U.S. honey bee gene pool. Video by WSU College of Agricultural, Human and Natural Resource Sciences.

 

 

Click the image above to see how semen is extract from honey bees

Liquid nitrogen used to preserve semen from imperiled subspecies.

PULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University researchers are preparing to use liquid nitrogen to create a frozen semen bank from select U.S. and European honey bee colonies.

At the same time, the researchers will use genetic cross-breeding methods to … » More …

WSU releases four new wheat varieties

PULLMAN – WSU has released four new wheat varieties for commercialization, including Xerpha, a soft-white common winter wheat, which is highly adapted to a broad range of production zones in Washington, Oregon, southern Idaho and northern California.

“WSU’s job is to work in partnership with industry so growers will have the best varieties possible,” said Ralph Cavalieri, director of the Agricultural Research Center and associate dean of the College of Agricultural, Human and Natural Resource Sciences. “These new varieties are the product of good science, hard work and the dedication of our breeding teams.”

In 2006 and 2007, Xerpha, a product of Steve Jones» More …

Organic wheat breeding lands $680,000 grant

PULLMAN — Stephen Jones, a Washington State University wheat breeder, has received a $680,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture to develop wheat varieties suited for low-input and organic agriculture systems.The funding will underwrite continuing research in the nation’s only certified organic wheat breeding program.Organic demand“There’s a tremendous demand for organic wheat,” Jones said. “Organic food is one of the few facets of the food industry that continues to grow.”While conventional has long held that the best wheat varieties will thrive in any production system, research in Jones’ program has disproved that notion.Back in time“There are different pressures in different systems,” Jones said. “If … » More …

Research suggests herbicide may suppress soybean rust

Promising lab results by researchers at Washington State University and the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Agricultural Research Service show the herbicide glyphosate has activity in suppressing Asian soybean rust. WSU has applied for U.S. and international patent protection, which will be published soon. WSU, through its Washington State Research Foundation, intends to license this intellectual property broadly. The foundation already has reached a preliminary agreement with Monsanto Co., the producer of glyphosate-based Roundup agricultural herbicides.The research was funded by a USDA Biotechnology Risk Assessment Grant and WSU.In the process of studying fungal pathogens in wheat, Kim Kidwell, a spring wheat breeder; graduate student Jamie Baley; … » More …

Beetle invades crops; Extension preparing for counterattack

Washington State University Extension is seeking information from farmers who have infestations of  cereal leaf beetles in their fields to aid a statewide biocontrol project. (Photo left)Biocontrol is the deliberate use of one living organism to control another.The cereal leaf beetle is a newcomer to the state, according to Diana Roberts, WSU Spokane County area extension educator.  “While it can infest most crops in the grass family, including Timothy hay, the insect prefers oats, wheat, and barley. Spring crops and irrigated fields usually experience most loss.”She said that both adult and larval stages of the insect feed on plants and damage appears as longitudinal white … » More …