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April 9: Pollinators, sustainable agriculture presented
March 26, 2015

beePULLMAN, Wash. – “A bee’s eye perspective on sustainable agriculture” will be presented by the co-director of the Berkeley Food Institute in a free, public lecture at 6 p.m. Thursday, April 9, in CUE 203 at Washington State University. A reception will begin at 5 p.m. in CUE 518.

Invading stink bug eats Cinderella’s pumpkins
November 12, 2014

By Linda Weiford, WSU News

Stink-bug-80VANCOUVER, Wash. – Why an insect the size of a fingernail has been compared to a great white shark is becoming more apparent as the brown marmorated stink bug accelerates across the Pacific Northwest.

Bee ‘shouts’ might evolve as more effective than ‘whispers’
July 7, 2014

Eavesdropping-80PULLMAN, Wash. – Let’s say you’re a bee and you’ve spotted a new and particularly lucrative source of nectar and pollen. What’s the best way to communicate the location of this prize cache of food to the rest of your nestmates without revealing it to competitors, or “eavesdropping” spies, outside of the colony?

April 4: Free bee movies, insect displays, beehive
April 3, 2014

bee-movie-80PULLMAN, Wash. – A live beehive, insect displays and movies will be open free to the public at the 18th annual Insect Cinema Cult Classic hosted by the Washington State University entomology graduate student association at 6 p.m. Friday, April 4, in Todd 276.

Insects studied to understand changing Elwha ecosystem
December 18, 2013

insect-80PULLMAN, Wash. – As the largest dam removal in U.S. history brought Pacific salmon back to Washington’s Elwha River for the first time in nearly a century, scientists were considering the changing ecosystem’s impact on those foundational Elwha Valley dwellers: insects.

Friendship between researcher, teenager benefits honey bees
November 20, 2013

By Kate Wilhite, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

Sheridan-Miller-80PULLMAN, Wash. – At just 16 years old, Sheridan Miller is already a veteran fundraiser. The Mill Valley, Calif., teenager recently donated $1,400 she raised to help support Washington State University’s honey bee stock improvement program. Over the past six years, she has raised more than $5,000 to help fund research aimed at combating colony collapse disorder (CCD) and saving the honey bee.

Close encounters of the wasp kind
August 14, 2013

yellowjacketYAKIMA, Wash. – As August wears on and wasp colonies reach peak size, sun worshippers and picnickers beware: One rolled-up newspaper swat at a yellowjacket crawling toward that spilled ice tea or platter of grilled hamburgers could unleash a flying armada of angry co-workers if a nest is nearby.
 
When a yellowjacket is smashed, its venom sac releases an alarm chemical that alerts nearby guard wasps to come and defend, according to Peter Landolt, a research entomologist with the U.S. Department of Agriculture in Yakima and adjunct faculty member at Washington State University. Even the … » More …

WSU scientist: Dreaded spider doesn’t live here
June 18, 2013

brown recluse

This brown recluse floating in an alcohol-filled vial came from the southern United States.
(Photos by Robert Hubner, WSU Photo Services)

 

Zack

WSU entomologist
Richard Zack. It’s a
myth that brown
recluses live in the
Northwest, he says.

PULLMAN, Wash. – We’ve all seen them — brown recluse spiders scuttling in the bathtub, scurrying in the tool shed or spinning a web under the porch light.

That is, we think we’ve seen them.

Contrary to what many people believe, the brown recluse, or Loxosceles reclusa, … » More …

WSU researchers preparing bee semen bank
June 6, 2013

 

Sheppard and Cobey discuss the challenges facing honey bees and the efforts to expand the U.S. honey bee gene pool. Video by WSU College of Agricultural, Human and Natural Resource Sciences.

 

 

Click the image above to see how semen is extract from honey bees

Liquid nitrogen used to preserve semen from imperiled subspecies.

PULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University researchers are preparing to use liquid nitrogen to create a frozen semen bank from select U.S. and European honey bee colonies.

At the same time, the researchers will use genetic cross-breeding methods to … » More …