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WSU News honey bee

Study: Neonicotinoid pesticides pose low risk to honey bees

By Maegan Murray, WSU Tri-Cities

RICHLAND, Wash. – While neonicotinoid pesticides can harm honey bees, a new study by Washington State University researchers shows that the substances pose little risk to bees in real-world settings. » More …

Importing frozen honey bee sperm is key to conservation

Brandon-Hopkins-talks-in-lab-web

By Scott Weybright, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

PULLMAN, Wash. – Going through customs can be frustrating for travelers. Imagine going through with a container of frozen bee sperm. » More …

Extension helps new beekeepers care for vital pollinators

By Seth Truscott, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

SPOKANE, Wash. – Apprentice beekeeper Bethe Bowman never thought she would care so deeply about the humble honey bee. Taking beekeeping classes through Washington State University Extension, she installed two buzzing backyard hives, each containing roughly 30,000 bees, this spring. » More …

Starts Nov. 16: WSU Extension offers beekeeping series

beeEVERETT, Wash. – The Master Beekeeper introductory/refresher course will be 6:30-9:30 p.m. Mondays, Nov. 16-Dec. 14, in McCollum Park at Washington State University Snohomish County Extension’s Cougar Auditorium, 600 128th St. SE, Everett. The five-week course will repeat beginning Feb. 22. » More …

Can mushrooms save the honey bee?

By Sylvia Kantor, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

Steve-Sheppard-80PULLMAN, Wash. – Research by a Washington State University bee scientist and a mushroom farmer indicates that extracts from the fungus might help honey bees fight off disease and parasites.  » More …

WSU researchers preparing bee semen bank

 

Sheppard and Cobey discuss the challenges facing honey bees and the efforts to expand the U.S. honey bee gene pool. Video by WSU College of Agricultural, Human and Natural Resource Sciences.

 

 

Click the image above to see how semen is extract from honey bees

Liquid nitrogen used to preserve semen from imperiled subspecies.

PULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University researchers are preparing to use liquid nitrogen to create a frozen semen bank from select U.S. and European honey bee colonies.

At the same time, the researchers will use genetic cross-breeding methods to … » More …

Honey bee expert to deliver Catts Lectures

PULLMAN — Thomas E. Rinderer, research geneticist and research leader with the USDA-Agricultural Research Service Honey Bee Breeding, Genetics and Physiology Laboratory in Baton Rouge, La., will deliver two lectures during the 11th annual E. Paul Catts Memorial Lecture Series on March 22 and 23.Rinderer will speak on “Africanized Honey Bees in the Americas: Understanding One of the Greatest Population Genetic Events of Our Time” at 7 p.m., Thursday, March 22, at the Quality Inn Paradise Creek. A catered dinner will be held prior to the lecture. Contact Barb Smith at (509) 335-5504 for more information about the dinner. On Friday, Rinderer will speak on “From … » More …