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WSU News bees

Researchers feed, breed, protect bees to survive winter

By Seth Truscott, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

beePULLMAN, Wash. – Gathering last-minute sips of nectar and pollen, bees at the Washington State University Teaching Apiary recently made the most of an unusually warm, 60-degree November day. » More …

Extension helps new beekeepers care for vital pollinators

By Seth Truscott, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

SPOKANE, Wash. – Apprentice beekeeper Bethe Bowman never thought she would care so deeply about the humble honey bee. Taking beekeeping classes through Washington State University Extension, she installed two buzzing backyard hives, each containing roughly 30,000 bees, this spring. » More …

Provost wears bees to raise awareness of bees, research

Bernardo-bee-beardPULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University Provost Dan Bernardo didn’t break a sweat as a few thousand honey bees formed a beard on his face for a good cause Friday afternoon. » More …

Beekeepers are now ‘farmers’ in Washington state

By Linda Weiford, WSU News

Bee-apple-tree-80PULLMAN, Wash. – A new law that defines Washington’s commercial beekeepers as farmers will enable the state to better reap the benefits of healthy bee populations while boosting a critical profession, according to a bee expert at Washington State University. » More …

Leaning on native bees amid the honey bee decline

By Rachel Webber, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

bee-on-lavender-80PULLMAN, Wash. – As the decline of honey bee populations garners international attention, David Crowder and Eli Bloom are turning to a different breed of bees for pollination services. » More …

Bee ‘shouts’ might evolve as more effective than ‘whispers’

Eavesdropping-80PULLMAN, Wash. – Let’s say you’re a bee and you’ve spotted a new and particularly lucrative source of nectar and pollen. What’s the best way to communicate the location of this prize cache of food to the rest of your nestmates without revealing it to competitors, or “eavesdropping” spies, outside of the colony? » More …

Battle of the bee mites

Varroa desturctor. The name evokes evil entities and comic book mayhem. But there is nothing funny about the Varroa honey bee mite. The tiny beast — an inadvertent stowaway on bees smuggled into the U.S. sometime before 1987 — now infests honey bee colonies across most of North America and is responsible for widespread destruction of hives. The mites, which feast on the blood of immature bees as they develop in their wax-capped brood cells, cause weight loss in the adult bee together with deformities, disease and reduced lifespan. Untreated, an entire honey bee colony can be wiped out within two years or less. Steve … » More …