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Tasmanian devils evolve to resist deadly cancer
August 30, 2016

By Will Ferguson, College of Arts & Sciences

Tasmanian-devil-from-Storfer-lab-websitePULLMAN, Wash. – Tasmanian devils are evolving in response to a highly lethal and contagious form of cancer, a Washington State University researcher has found.

Genetic mechanism found for fish adaptations to pollution
February 9, 2016

By Eric Sorensen, WSU science writer

Kelley-J-2013-80PULLMAN, Wash. – A Washington State University biologist has found the genetic mechanism that lets a fish live in toxic, acidic water. The discovery opens new insights into the functioning of other “extremophiles” and how they adapt to their challenging environments.

Study: Environmental epigenetics affects disease, evolution
August 3, 2015

By Eric Sorensen, WSU science writer

Skinner-Michael-2012-80PULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University researchers say environmental factors are having an underappreciated effect on the course of disease and evolution by prompting genetic mutations through epigenetics, a process by which genes are turned on and off independent of an organism’s DNA sequence.

New age for Panama closure challenges long-held theories
April 9, 2015

panama-mapPULLMAN, Wash. – The Panama Isthmus is so strategic that more than 100 years ago global powers France and the United States took on the monumental task of constructing the Panama Canal. They sought to shorten transit times between Asia, Europe and the Americas by re-joining the Pacific and Caribbean seas. If you want to rule the world, Panama is crucial.

‘Darwin and Intelligent Design’ philosophy lecture canceled
February 17, 2015

By Adriana Aumen, College of Arts & Sciences

ElliottSober-80PULLMAN, Wash. – Presentations about the struggle between Charles Darwin’s theory of evolution and intelligent design for the 53rd Frank Fraser Potter Memorial Lecture in Philosophy and the Potter Talk on Thursday, March 12, have been canceled due to speaker injury. They might be rescheduled in the fall.

Oct. 28: Authors to discuss nature’s wisdom, agriculture
October 15, 2014

By Sylvia Kantor, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

Denison,-left,-and-MarrisPULLMAN, Wash. – A free, public symposium, “Saving Nature and Improving Agriculture: Where Does Nature’s Wisdom Lie?” will begin at 4 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 28, in the CUB junior ballroom at Washington State University Pullman.

Researcher sees survival story in fly’s small genome
August 12, 2014

By Eric Sorensen, WSU science writer

KelleyPULLMAN, Wash. – Few animals can boast of being as tough as the Antarctic midge. Its larvae develop over not one but two Antarctic winters, losing nearly half their body mass each time. It endures high winds, salt and intense ultraviolet radiation. As an adult, the midge gets by without wings and lives for only a week or so before starting the life cycle all over again.

Bee ‘shouts’ might evolve as more effective than ‘whispers’
July 7, 2014

Eavesdropping-80PULLMAN, Wash. – Let’s say you’re a bee and you’ve spotted a new and particularly lucrative source of nectar and pollen. What’s the best way to communicate the location of this prize cache of food to the rest of your nestmates without revealing it to competitors, or “eavesdropping” spies, outside of the colony?

International team sequences rainbow trout genome
April 22, 2014

By Eric Sorensen, WSU science writer

thorgaard-80PULLMAN, Wash. – Using fish bred at Washington State University, an international team of researchers has mapped the genetic profile of the rainbow trout, a versatile salmonid whose relatively recent genetic history opens a window into how vertebrates evolve.

Shark fossil reveals new insights into jaw evolution
April 16, 2014

3-D-shark-skull-2-180NEW YORK – The skull of a newly discovered 325-million-year-old shark-like species suggests that early cartilaginous and bony fishes have more to tell us about the early evolution of jawed vertebrates – including humans – than do modern sharks, as was previously thought.