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WSU News bee

Study: Neonicotinoid pesticides pose low risk to honey bees

By Maegan Murray, WSU Tri-Cities

RICHLAND, Wash. – While neonicotinoid pesticides can harm honey bees, a new study by Washington State University researchers shows that the substances pose little risk to bees in real-world settings. » More …

Importing frozen honey bee sperm is key to conservation

Brandon-Hopkins-talks-in-lab-web

By Scott Weybright, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

PULLMAN, Wash. – Going through customs can be frustrating for travelers. Imagine going through with a container of frozen bee sperm. » More …

Media advisory: WSU provost to don a ‘bee beard’

bee-facility

What: Washington State University is helping restore bee populations through its bee and pollinator program, which seeks to build a Bee and Pollinator Research Center on the Pullman campus. » More …

April 9: Pollinators, sustainable agriculture presented

beePULLMAN, Wash. – “A bee’s eye perspective on sustainable agriculture” will be presented by the co-director of the Berkeley Food Institute in a free, public lecture at 6 p.m. Thursday, April 9, in CUE 203 at Washington State University. A reception will begin at 5 p.m. in CUE 518. » More …

WSU, bee industry to fund study

PULLMAN – WSU scientists and Pacific Northwest beekeepers are joining forces to find out what is causing the mysterious Colony Collapse Disorder that has wiped out thousands of hives throughout the region over the past several years.

Two large beekeepers in the Pacific Northwest – Eric Olson of Yakima and Tom Hamilton of Nampa, Idaho – have made donations as seed money for the research. Noyes Apiaries in New Plymouth, Idaho, the Idaho Honey Association and the Washington State Beekeepers Registration Fund also have made contributions. With those donations and dedicated funds from the WSU Agricultural Research Center, researchers will spend nearly $200,000 over the … » More …

Become a beekeeper with WSU workshop

EVERETT – Whether you live in the city, the suburbs, on a farm or in the woods, you can become a beekeeper. Beekeeping is an excellent hobby that can easily become an income producer. WSU Snohomish County Extension is offering a Beginning Beekeeping Workshop to help you get started.

 

And, given the nationwide crisis involving the collapse of commercial bee colonies, there’s never been a better time. Bees are essential to the pollenating of fruit orchards, flowers, etc.

The workshop will be held on Wednesday, Mar. 19, from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. at the Snohomish County Extension office, 600 128th Street S.E. … » More …