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Study: Neonicotinoid pesticides pose low risk to honey bees
August 15, 2016

By Maegan Murray, WSU Tri-Cities

RICHLAND, Wash. – While neonicotinoid pesticides can harm honey bees, a new study by Washington State University researchers shows that the substances pose little risk to bees in real-world settings.

Importing frozen honey bee sperm is key to conservation
July 25, 2016

Brandon-Hopkins-talks-in-lab-web

By Scott Weybright, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

PULLMAN, Wash. – Going through customs can be frustrating for travelers. Imagine going through with a container of frozen bee sperm.

Can mushrooms save the honey bee?
February 17, 2015

By Sylvia Kantor, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

Steve-Sheppard-80PULLMAN, Wash. – Research by a Washington State University bee scientist and a mushroom farmer indicates that extracts from the fungus might help honey bees fight off disease and parasites. 

Leaning on native bees amid the honey bee decline
September 30, 2014

By Rachel Webber, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

bee-on-lavender-80PULLMAN, Wash. – As the decline of honey bee populations garners international attention, David Crowder and Eli Bloom are turning to a different breed of bees for pollination services.

Friendship between researcher, teenager benefits honey bees
November 20, 2013

By Kate Wilhite, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

Sheridan-Miller-80PULLMAN, Wash. – At just 16 years old, Sheridan Miller is already a veteran fundraiser. The Mill Valley, Calif., teenager recently donated $1,400 she raised to help support Washington State University’s honey bee stock improvement program. Over the past six years, she has raised more than $5,000 to help fund research aimed at combating colony collapse disorder (CCD) and saving the honey bee.