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WSU News waste

Whey facility will clean waste, provide career training

By Scott Weybright, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

PULLMAN, Wash. – When the Washington State University creamery makes cheese, only 10 percent of the milk purchased from WSU’s Knott Dairy winds up in the final product. That will change soon when ground is broken on a new expansion. » More …

April 10: Finalists compete to develop plastic waste solutions

By Craig Lawson, International Programs

PULLMAN, Wash. – Five finalist teams will present their solutions for dealing with plastic waste in the environment at the free, public Annual Global Case Competition at 3:30 p.m. Friday, April 10, in Todd Hall 216 at Washington State University. » More …

Dec. 2: Environmental ethics, waste on the Palouse discussed

By Bev Makhani, Office of Undergraduate Education

Garbology-100PULLMAN, Wash. – The impacts and ethics of waste disposal on the Palouse will be discussed at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 2, in Todd 116 as part of the Washington State University Common Reading Tuesdays lecture series. » More …

Nov. 17 deadline for ag waste, environment abstracts

By Kate Wilhite, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

waste-logo-80PULLMAN, Wash. – A national conference addressing the effects of manure from agricultural operations on water, air, soil and climate is calling for abstracts. “Waste to Worth” will take place March 31–April 3 in Seattle. The deadline for abstracts is Nov. 17. » More …

Researchers develop unique waste cleanup for rural areas

By Tina Hilding, Voiland College of Engineering & Architecture

Beyenal-and-EwingPULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University researchers have developed a unique method to use microbes buried in pond sediment to power waste cleanup in rural areas. » More …

‘Garbology’ book selected as 2014-15 common reading

Garbology-100By Beverly Makhani, Office of Undergraduate Education

PULLMAN, Wash. – Americans each produce 102 tons of trash in a lifetime. Impacts and implications of “the invisible waste embedded in America’s consumer society” are discussed in the common reading book that will be used 2014-15 at Washington State University Pullman. » More …

Compost: Closing the loop on urban garbage and local farms

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Commercial compost is spread at a Snohomish County farm. (Photo by Andrew Corbin, WSU)

By Sylvia Kantor, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

SNOHOMISH COUNTY, Wash. – Compost produced from urban food and yard waste could be “black gold” to farmers wanting to increase their yields and profits while improving soil and water quality. Washington State University Extension in Snohomish County is exploring how urbanization, long considered a threat to local agriculture, might actually help farmers keep up with demand for local food while recovering a valuable resource from the urban waste stream. » More …

Microbes generate electricity in Dana Hall outreach

MFC lights

 

 

microbes generate electricityPULLMAN, Wash. – In a hallway in a building at the engineering end of campus, a string of small, red LED lights blink unobtrusively, powered by a bucket of muddy water.

 

Dedicated crews of microscopic bacteria in the mud generate electricity by doing what bacteria do best: eating.
 
“The microbes eat organic material and transfer electrons to an anode buried in the sediment,” said Timothy Ewing, the Ph.D. student who helped put together the microbial fuel cell powering the lights. “The … » More …