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WSU News plastic

Ask Dr. Universe: Why do nonbiodegradables decay slowly?

PULLMAN, Wash. – It can take a really long time for some things to decay. If we buried an apple peel in the backyard, it might only take a few weeks to break down into the soil. But if we buried a plastic water bottle, it would probably still be there hundreds of years from now. » More …

April 10: Finalists compete to develop plastic waste solutions

By Craig Lawson, International Programs

PULLMAN, Wash. – Five finalist teams will present their solutions for dealing with plastic waste in the environment at the free, public Annual Global Case Competition at 3:30 p.m. Friday, April 10, in Todd Hall 216 at Washington State University. » More …

Feb. 26: Eco-artist links albatross deaths to sea of trash

By Beverly Makhani, Office of Undergraduate Education

Chris-Jordan-80PULLMAN, Wash. – Environmental artist Chris Jordan will discuss albatross chicks that died from eating plastic trash in a free, public presentation, “Encountering Midway: A Barometer for Our Culture and Our World,” at 7 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 26, in the CUB auditorium at Washington State University. » More …

Museum of Art presents “Running the Numbers”

Plastic Bottles, 2007 – depicts two million
plastic beverage bottles, the number used in the
U.S. every five minutes.

 

PULLMAN – The Museum of Art at WSU will exhibit “Running the Numbers” by Chris Jordan. The exhibition opens Wednesday, Jan. 14 and runs through Saturday, April 4.

Jordan will lecture on his work at 7 p.m. Jan. 22 in the Compton Union Building Auditorium. A special lecture with environmentalist Paul Hawken will take place at 7 p.m. Feb. 25 in the Compton Union Building Auditorium.

In 2006, Jordan began a series of digital … » More …