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Better water splitting advances renewable energy conversion
October 25, 2016

By Tina Hilding, Voiland College of Engineering & Architecture

catlyst-webPULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University researchers have found a way to more efficiently create hydrogen from water – an important key in making renewable energy production and storage viable.

Researchers reduce costly noble metals for fuel cell reactions
August 22, 2016

By Erik Gomez, Voiland College of Engineering & Architecture intern

yuehe-LinPULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University researchers have developed a novel nanomaterial that could improve the performance and lower the costs of fuel cells by using fewer precious metals like platinum or palladium.

Researchers determine key improvement for fuel cells
July 18, 2016

By Tina Hilding, Voiland College of Engineering & Architecture

McEwenPULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University researchers have determined a key step in improving solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), a promising clean energy technology that has struggled to gain wide acceptance in the marketplace.

WSU researchers develop fuel cells for increased airplane efficiency
June 16, 2014

PULLMAN, Wash.– Washington State University researchers have developed the first fuel cell that can directly convert fuels, such as jet fuel or gasoline, to electricity, providing a dramatically more energy-efficient way to create electric power for planes or cars.

Video: Light up your holidays with microbial fuel cell
December 17, 2013

microbe-tree-80PULLMAN, Wash. – Under a tiny Christmas tree in an engineering building on the Washington State University campus sits a questionable “gift” – a muddy bucket of water with a “Happy Holidays” greeting.

Microbes generate electricity in Dana Hall outreach
August 7, 2013

MFC lights

 

 

microbes generate electricityPULLMAN, Wash. – In a hallway in a building at the engineering end of campus, a string of small, red LED lights blink unobtrusively, powered by a bucket of muddy water.

 

Dedicated crews of microscopic bacteria in the mud generate electricity by doing what bacteria do best: eating.
 
“The microbes eat organic material and transfer electrons to an anode buried in the sediment,” said Timothy Ewing, the Ph.D. student who helped put together the microbial fuel cell powering the lights. “The … » More …