Skip to main content Skip to navigation
WSU News pollution

Puget Sound revitalization pursued by citizens, WSU Extension

puget sound partnership logo kayakIt is estimated that 75 percent of contamination in the Puget Sound is unwittingly produced by citizens — via commercial wastewater, sewage treatment plants, stormwater runoff from roads and paved surfaces, construction and other activities. » More …

Researchers develop environmentally friendly, soy air filter

By Tina Hilding, Voiland College of Engineering & Architecture

PULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University researchers have developed a soy-based air filter that can capture toxic chemicals, such as carbon monoxide and formaldehyde, that current air filters can’t. » More …

April 12: WSU expert to speak about stormwater pollution

By Sylvia Kantor, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

innovators-salmon-webSEATTLE – Washington State University aquatic ecotoxicologist Jenifer McIntyre will share her research on the lethal impacts of stormwater for fish as well as solutions that are within reach. » More …

Genetic mechanism found for fish adaptations to pollution

By Eric Sorensen, WSU science writer

Kelley-J-2013-80PULLMAN, Wash. – A Washington State University biologist has found the genetic mechanism that lets a fish live in toxic, acidic water. The discovery opens new insights into the functioning of other “extremophiles” and how they adapt to their challenging environments. » More …

Feb. 26: Eco-artist links albatross deaths to sea of trash

By Beverly Makhani, Office of Undergraduate Education

Chris-Jordan-80PULLMAN, Wash. – Environmental artist Chris Jordan will discuss albatross chicks that died from eating plastic trash in a free, public presentation, “Encountering Midway: A Barometer for Our Culture and Our World,” at 7 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 26, in the CUB auditorium at Washington State University. » More …

‘Garbology’ book selected as 2014-15 common reading

Garbology-100By Beverly Makhani, Office of Undergraduate Education

PULLMAN, Wash. – Americans each produce 102 tons of trash in a lifetime. Impacts and implications of “the invisible waste embedded in America’s consumer society” are discussed in the common reading book that will be used 2014-15 at Washington State University Pullman. » More …

Creating cleaner water source vital to aquatic life, people

biretention project in Puyallup Washington
WSU Puyallup researchers inspect the sprinkler system used to simulate rain events on the asphalt test plot. (l-r) Curtis Hinman, low-impact development extension specialist; Jen McIntyre, postdoctoral researcher, stormwater program; and Richard Bembenek, agriculture research technician, low-impact development. Photo by Betsy Fradd, WSU Extension Puyallup. 

Stormwater project logo

Jen McIntyre, WSU Extension Puyallup

McIntyre

PUYALLUP, Wash. – Finding a solution to toxic highway runoff is crucial to the environment. Research scientists at … » More …

Sterilizing Mars spacecraft is largely a waste of money

Schulze-Makuch

WSU’s Schulze-Makuch

PULLMAN, Wash. – Two university researchers say environmental restrictions have become unnecessarily restrictive and expensive – on Mars.

Writing in the journal Nature Geoscience, astrobiologists Alberto Fairén of Cornell University and Dirk Schulze-Makuch of Washington State University say the NASA Office of Planetary Protection’s “detailed and expensive” efforts to keep Earth microorganisms off Mars are making missions to search for life on the red planet “unviable.”

The researchers claim “the protocols and policies of planetary protection are unnecessarily restricting Mars exploration and need to be revised.”

The Office of Planetary Protection is like an … » More …

Nuclear waste panel fails to address underlying mistrust

Rosa

PULLMAN – A renewed federal effort to fix the nation’s stalled nuclear waste program is focusing so much on technological issues that it fails to address the public mistrust hampering storage and disposal efforts.
 
Writing in the latest issue of the journal Science, 16 researchers from around the country say a special White House panel on high-level radioactive waste needs to focus more on the social and political acceptability of its solutions to succeed.

 

“While scientific and technical analyses are essential, they will not, and arguably should not, carry the day unless they … » More …