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A mother’s microbial gift
January 2, 2018

PULLMAN, Wash. – It happened again, most recently at a conference in Prague. After she gave her talk, a scientist came up to Shelley McGuire, a pioneer exploring the microbial communities found in human breast milk, and told her, “You don’t know how to take a sample. Your samples must have been contaminated. Human milk is sterile.”

Ask Dr. Universe: Why do nonbiodegradables decay slowly?
February 7, 2017

PULLMAN, Wash. – It can take a really long time for some things to decay. If we buried an apple peel in the backyard, it might only take a few weeks to break down into the soil. But if we buried a plastic water bottle, it would probably still be there hundreds of years from now.

Ask Dr. Universe: Can you grow clothes?
March 23, 2015

Dr-Universe-230PULLMAN, Wash. – We can use all kinds of animal, bug, and plant materials to make cloth. Even some of the tiniest living things on the planet can make cloth, too.

Researchers develop unique waste cleanup for rural areas
September 18, 2014

By Tina Hilding, Voiland College of Engineering & Architecture

Beyenal-and-EwingPULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University researchers have developed a unique method to use microbes buried in pond sediment to power waste cleanup in rural areas.