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WSU News alternative energy

Chemists make major strides in organic semiconductors

By Will Ferguson, College of Arts & Sciences

PULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University chemists have created new materials that pave the way for the development of inexpensive solar cells. Their work has been recognized as one of the most influential studies published in the Journal of Materials Chemistry in 2016. » More …

Students compete in alternative energy challenge

By Tina Hilding, Voiland College of Engineering & Architecture

im-tomm-headPULLMAN, Wash. – More than 500 students from 40 schools in Washington and Idaho will compete at Washington State University Saturday for up to $100,000 in cash prizes in the Alaska Airlines’ Imagine Tomorrow competition. » More …

May 1 deadline: Help high-schoolers invent renewable energy

By Richard H. Miller, Global Campus

imagine-tomorrowPULLMAN, Wash. – The 2015 Imagine Tomorrow competition is seeking judges to evaluate the work of 9th- through 12th-graders exploring alternative energy sources. The deadline for judges to register is May 1. » More …

WSU hosts teens’ renewable energy solutions

Photos by Robert Hubner, WSU Photo Services

PULLMAN, Wash. – Hundreds of students from high schools across the state competed for more than $100,000 in cash prizes at the annual Imagine Tomorrow alternative energy challenge at Washington State University over the weekend. » More …

May 5 deadline for Imagine Tomorrow judges

By Richard H. Miller, Conference Management

Imagine-Tomorrow-logo-80PULLMAN, Wash. – The 2014 Imagine Tomorrow competition is seeking judges to evaluate the work of 9th- through 12th-graders exploring alternative energy sources. The deadline for judges to register is May 5. » More …

Undergrads earn scholarships for research in alternative fuels, renewable energy

PULLMAN, Wash. – Undergraduate research in alternative fuels and renewable energy got a boost thanks to support for four Washington State University students from the DeVlieg Foundation and Weyerhaeuser Company. » More …

Microbes generate electricity in Dana Hall outreach

MFC lights

 

 

microbes generate electricityPULLMAN, Wash. – In a hallway in a building at the engineering end of campus, a string of small, red LED lights blink unobtrusively, powered by a bucket of muddy water.

 

Dedicated crews of microscopic bacteria in the mud generate electricity by doing what bacteria do best: eating.
 
“The microbes eat organic material and transfer electrons to an anode buried in the sediment,” said Timothy Ewing, the Ph.D. student who helped put together the microbial fuel cell powering the lights. “The … » More …