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WSU News fungus

Researcher fights fungus in apples, pears under storage

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By Seth Truscott, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

WENATCHEE, Wash. – Delving into the secrets of the molds and fungi that can wreck a good apple or pear, Achour Amiri can be found working in packing rooms and warehouses throughout central Washington this time of year. » More …

Identifying grapevine fungus may help fight disease

By Erika Holmes, Viticulture & Enology

Holland-webPULLMAN, Wash. – Researchers at Washington State University have documented seven fungal species that cause cankers in grapevines. These new findings could reduce the incidence of grapevine trunk disease in Washington vineyards by preventing the problem before it becomes widespread. » More …

Northwest sees morel shroom boom

By Linda Weiford, WSU News

morel-closeupPULLMAN, WASH. – Morels, wild mushrooms prized for their depth of flavor, are enjoying a banner year in much of the Pacific Northwest. Not only did they appear early, but there are lots of them and they are good quality, according to a mushroom expert at Washington State University. » More …

Researchers produce jet fuel compounds from fungus

By Tina Hilding, Voiland College of Engineering & Architecture

Ahring-and-student-webRICHLAND, Wash. – Washington State University researchers have found a way to make jet fuel from a common black fungus found in decaying leaves, soil and rotting fruit. The researchers hope the process leads to economically viable production of aviation biofuels in the next five years. » More …

Can mushrooms save the honey bee?

By Sylvia Kantor, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

Steve-Sheppard-80PULLMAN, Wash. – Research by a Washington State University bee scientist and a mushroom farmer indicates that extracts from the fungus might help honey bees fight off disease and parasites.  » More …

Wet springs may be affecting ponderosa pine health

By Rachel Webber, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

foliar-pathogens-80SPOKANE, Wash. – What’s wrong with my ponderosa pine trees? Are they dying? Why are the needles turning brown and reddish? Forestry experts have received several inquiries about ponderosa pine tree health this spring, so if you’re asking these questions, you are not alone. » More …

Illness-causing fungus spreads to Washington state

By Linda Weiford, WSU News

Cocci-fungus-80PULLMAN, Wash. – A fungus found in semiarid parts of the Southwest that sometimes launches a lethal illness has been identified for the first time in Washington state soil, leading public health officials and an internationally known fungal expert at Washington State University to believe the organism is quietly spreading to the Northwest. » More …

‘Mushroom queen’ hunts fungus among us

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Carris, left, shows students the fruiting body of a Fomitopsis pinicola fungus growing on a tree.

By Linda Weiford, WSU News

PULLMAN, Wash. – October marks the peak of wild mushroom picking in the Northwest, and a Washington State University plant pathologist nicknamed the “mushroom queen” is just the person you’d want in tow. She can keep you from getting lost in the woods and from eating a mushroom that tastes bad – or worse, one that will make you sick. » More …