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Feb. 8: ‘Healthy Soils, Healthy Farms’ workshop
January 12, 2018

Palouse farm fields and soilPULLMAN, Wash. – “Healthy Soils, Healthy Farms,” a workshop designed for farmers and interested residents in Eastern Washington and Northern Idaho, will be presented by Washington State University Extension, 7:45 a.m. Thursday, Feb. 8, at Banyan’s Pavilion.

NSF grant aims to use big data to improve crops
August 7, 2017

By Tina Hilding, Voiland College of Engineering and Architecture

PULLMAN, Wash. – WSU researchers are leading a multi-university effort to improve crop management in the age of big data.

Center helps scientists measure light to find mutations
October 30, 2014

By Scott Weybright, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

False-color-80PULLMAN, Wash. – Plants use light during photosynthesis. But they also give off light, though in amounts so small we can’t see it. The amount of light changes based on the plant’s environment and genetic makeup.

Grant helps WSU improve state’s most valuable crops
October 8, 2014

By Sylvia Kantor, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

rosaceae-200-iStock-photoPULLMAN, Wash. – Scientists at Washington State University have been awarded $2.53 million to improve fruit quality and disease resistance of crops in the rosaceae family (apple, blackberry, peach, pear, rose, strawberry, sweet cherry and tart cherry).

Researchers explain mystery of cereal grain defense
September 15, 2014

By Rebecca Phillips, University Communications science writer

barley_field-130PULLMAN, Wash. – Crop scientists at Washington State University have explained how genes in the barley plant turn on defenses against aging and stressors like drought, heat and disease.

Fungal disease breaks out in Pacific Northwest crops
August 25, 2014

By Rachel Webber, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

Cabbage-seed-infectedMOUNT VERNON, Wash. – Vegetable and oilseed growers are advised to take extra precautions after an outbreak of three fungal diseases in Pacific Northwest crops, said plant pathologist Lindsey du Toit.

Quinoa: Seeds of hope for Rwandan researcher
July 15, 2014

By Linda Weiford, WSU News  

habiyaremye-80PULLMAN, Wash. – A crop being test-grown at Washington State University’s Organic Farm is skyrocketing in popularity in North America. Even so, less than a year ago, a graduate student growing it at WSU had never seen or tasted it.

Super-absorbent gel could help farmers save water
June 30, 2014

By Tina Hilding, Voiland College of Engineering & Architecture

Gel-80PULLMAN, Wash. – A biodegradable gel that can absorb more than 250 times its weight in water could potentially help farmers retain moisture in drought-stricken fields.

June 12: Drought, wheat, alternatives topics at field day
May 15, 2014

Lind-research-stationLIND, Wash. – The 98th annual Washington State University Lind Field Day will be Thursday, June 12, at the WSU Dryland Research Station north of Lind, Wash. Registration for the free, public event begins at 8:30 a.m. with the field tour starting at 9 a.m.