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WSU News animals

Ask Dr. Universe: Do animals help our minds?

PULLMAN, Wash. – Our brains are pretty busy. They are constantly thinking, feeling and sensing our world. One thing that can help some people relax is spending time with an animal friend. You might play fetch with a dog, sit with a cat, brush a horse or even watch a goldfish zip around its bowl. » More …

Like a dog, like a frog, like a … starling?

By Linda Weiford, WSU News

starling,-wikipediaPULLMAN, Wash. – Did you hear the police siren wailing from a nearby treetop? How about the barking dog from a power line? Chances are you heard a common starling, a bird that’s making plenty of noise this time of year – not only in the Pacific Northwest but every state in the country. » More …

Research finds some gut bacteria resist malaria parasite

By Charlie Powell, College of Veterinary Medicine

Nicolas-VillarinoPULLMAN, Wash. – Microorganisms living in a person’s gut play a key role in how that individual may be affected by the malaria parasite, according to studies led by a Washington State University researcher. » More …

Through May: Library features wildlife photos by vet student

By Nella Letizia, WSU Libraries

PULLMAN, Wash. – Not much is different about the two side-by-side photographs of fourth-year Washington State University veterinary student Seth Bynum. He’s seated in the back of the same Chevy Tahoe, wearing a short-sleeved shirt, shorts, sandals and long hair, holding up a hand-lettered sign with the words “Montana or Bust.” » More …

Genetic mechanism found for fish adaptations to pollution

By Eric Sorensen, WSU science writer

Kelley-J-2013-80PULLMAN, Wash. – A Washington State University biologist has found the genetic mechanism that lets a fish live in toxic, acidic water. The discovery opens new insights into the functioning of other “extremophiles” and how they adapt to their challenging environments. » More …

Cut bats some slack; build them a home for Halloween

By Nella Letizia, WSU Libraries

PULLMAN, Wash. – No soundtrack to Halloween would be complete without the flapping wings and piercing squeaks of bats. They are the maligned creatures of the night this time of year and also part of the holiday decorating tsunami – as in uber-icky spongey blobs hanging off fishing line on front porches. » More …

Weighing benefits, risks of wild birds on organic farms

By Sylvia Kantor, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

Bluebird-80PULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University will help organic growers protect human health by assessing the risks and benefits of wild birds on organic farms. Researchers received nearly $2 million from the U.S. Department of Agriculture Organic Research and Extension Initiative to conduct the study. » More …

Study proposes first nationwide wildlife conservation network

By Will Ferguson, College of Arts & Sciences

elk-smallPULLMAN, Wash. – Wolves, elk and grizzly bears – some of the largest wild animals in America – are literally dying for more room to roam. But Alexander Fremier, associate professor in the School of the Environment at Washington State University, proposes a viable solution. » More …