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Washington SBDC arrives in Washington, D.C., with a Whooshh
February 26, 2018

By Hope Belli Tinney, Washington SBDC

SEATTLE, Wash. – Whooshh Innovations, creator of the so-called Salmon Cannon, was highlighted at the America’s Small Business Development Center’s Client Showcase on Capitol Hill last week.

WSU research reaches to marine science center display
April 13, 2016

By Tim Marsh, WSU News retiree

NEWPORT, Ore. – Tropical yellow tang, among the most popular aquarium fish, on display in the visitor center of the Hatfield Marine Science Center are part of a research project about aquarium fish survival conducted in part by researchers at Washington State University Vancouver.

April 12: WSU expert to speak about stormwater pollution
April 4, 2016

By Sylvia Kantor, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

innovators-salmon-webSEATTLE – Washington State University aquatic ecotoxicologist Jenifer McIntyre will share her research on the lethal impacts of stormwater for fish as well as solutions that are within reach.

Genetic mechanism found for fish adaptations to pollution
February 9, 2016

By Eric Sorensen, WSU science writer

Kelley-J-2013-80PULLMAN, Wash. – A Washington State University biologist has found the genetic mechanism that lets a fish live in toxic, acidic water. The discovery opens new insights into the functioning of other “extremophiles” and how they adapt to their challenging environments.

Saving fish, amphibians, reptiles from pandemic
June 29, 2015

By Will Ferguson, College of Arts & Sciences

turtlePULLMAN, Wash. – Jesse Brunner did a double take as he surveyed a pond in southern Arizona’s San Rafael Valley. It was home to endangered tiger salamanders and, over the course of one week, every salamander Brunner could find was sick or dying.

International team sequences rainbow trout genome
April 22, 2014

By Eric Sorensen, WSU science writer

thorgaard-80PULLMAN, Wash. – Using fish bred at Washington State University, an international team of researchers has mapped the genetic profile of the rainbow trout, a versatile salmonid whose relatively recent genetic history opens a window into how vertebrates evolve.

Shark fossil reveals new insights into jaw evolution
April 16, 2014

3-D-shark-skull-2-180NEW YORK – The skull of a newly discovered 325-million-year-old shark-like species suggests that early cartilaginous and bony fishes have more to tell us about the early evolution of jawed vertebrates – including humans – than do modern sharks, as was previously thought.