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WSU News fish

Washington SBDC arrives in Washington, D.C., with a Whooshh

By Hope Belli Tinney, Washington SBDC

SEATTLE, Wash. – Whooshh Innovations, creator of the so-called Salmon Cannon, was highlighted at the America’s Small Business Development Center’s Client Showcase on Capitol Hill last week. » More …

Dramatic decline in genetic diversity of Northwest salmon charted

By Eric Sorensen, WSU News

chinook salmon wa dept fish wildlife

PULLMAN, Wash. – Columbia River Chinook salmon have lost as much as two-thirds of their genetic diversity, Washington State University researchers have found. » More …

WSU research reaches to marine science center display

By Tim Marsh, WSU News retiree

NEWPORT, Ore. – Tropical yellow tang, among the most popular aquarium fish, on display in the visitor center of the Hatfield Marine Science Center are part of a research project about aquarium fish survival conducted in part by researchers at Washington State University Vancouver. » More …

April 12: WSU expert to speak about stormwater pollution

By Sylvia Kantor, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

innovators-salmon-webSEATTLE – Washington State University aquatic ecotoxicologist Jenifer McIntyre will share her research on the lethal impacts of stormwater for fish as well as solutions that are within reach. » More …

Genetic mechanism found for fish adaptations to pollution

By Eric Sorensen, WSU science writer

Kelley-J-2013-80PULLMAN, Wash. – A Washington State University biologist has found the genetic mechanism that lets a fish live in toxic, acidic water. The discovery opens new insights into the functioning of other “extremophiles” and how they adapt to their challenging environments. » More …

Saving fish, amphibians, reptiles from pandemic

By Will Ferguson, College of Arts & Sciences

turtlePULLMAN, Wash. – Jesse Brunner did a double take as he surveyed a pond in southern Arizona’s San Rafael Valley. It was home to endangered tiger salamanders and, over the course of one week, every salamander Brunner could find was sick or dying. » More …

International team sequences rainbow trout genome

By Eric Sorensen, WSU science writer

thorgaard-80PULLMAN, Wash. – Using fish bred at Washington State University, an international team of researchers has mapped the genetic profile of the rainbow trout, a versatile salmonid whose relatively recent genetic history opens a window into how vertebrates evolve. » More …