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WSU News conservation

WSU research highlights deforestation threat to jaguars

By Will Ferguson, College of Arts & Sciences

PULLMAN, Wash. – Accelerating deforestation of jaguar habitat, especially in corridors connecting conservation areas, threatens the long-term survival of the iconic predator, according to new research by Dan Thornton, an assistant professor in the Washington State University School of the Environment. » More …

Nov. 15: Commissioner to talk about state’s public lands

By Seth Truscott, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

GoldmarkPULLMAN, Wash. – A call to those who live in Washington to take action to protect and conserve its natural heritage will be part of a presentation by the state commissioner of public lands at noon Tuesday, Nov. 15, in Bryan Hall 308. Pizza and soda will be served. » More …

Popular conservation writer receives WSU alumni award

Johnsgard-80LINCOLN, Neb. – Paul Johnsgard, an ornithologist, artist and emeritus professor at the University of Nebraska, was honored July 12 with the Washington State University Alumni Association Alumni Achievement Award in recognition of writing and teaching that has expanded public understanding of natural history, conservation and pressing environmental issues. » More …

April 12: Talk on Northwest marine mammal conservation

Deborah-DuffieldPULLMAN, Wash. – The effects of ocean changes on Northwest marine mammals will be discussed by Deborah Duffield, professor of biology at Portland State University, in a free, public talk at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 12, in Abelson 201 at Washington State University. » More …

Advisor boosts business’ failing expansion to doubled revenue

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By Hope Belli Tinney, Washington SBDC

TUKWILA, Wash. – If your furnace is working overtime and you still have a cold, drafty house, the usual suspects are old windows and poor insulation. Or maybe a worn out furnace. » More …

Study proposes first nationwide wildlife conservation network

By Will Ferguson, College of Arts & Sciences

elk-smallPULLMAN, Wash. – Wolves, elk and grizzly bears – some of the largest wild animals in America – are literally dying for more room to roam. But Alexander Fremier, associate professor in the School of the Environment at Washington State University, proposes a viable solution. » More …

Conservation buffers please the eye, protect the landscape

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By Seth Truscott, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

PULLMAN, Wash. – Researchers know that adding natural buffers to the farm landscape can stop soil from vanishing. Now a scientist at Washington State University has found that more buffers are better, both for pleasing the eye and slowing erosion. » More …

Study: Conserving soil and water in dryland wheat region

By Sylvia Kantor, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

tillage-80LIND, Wash. – In the world’s driest rainfed wheat region, Washington State University researchers have identified summer fallow management practices that can make all the difference for farmers, water and soil conservation, and air quality. » More …

Scientist part of call in Nature for diverse conservation values

Nature-comment-220PULLMAN, Wash. – A call for inclusive conservation published in this week’s issue of the journal Nature is signed by 240 leading conservation scientists, including Stephanie Hampton, director of the Center for Environmental Research, Education and Outreach at Washington State University. » More …