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WSU News climate change

Researchers tackle impact of climate change on plants

By Eric Sorensen, WSU science writer

PULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University researchers are undertaking an industrious investigation into the effects of global warming on plants. Making the effort possible is a fully automated “plant hotel” that can analyze up to 6,000 seedlings in a single experiment. » More …

Jan. 27-29: Helping neighborhoods adapt to climate change

SAN FRANCISCO – Five public, community workshops to help some San Francisco neighborhoods adapt to sea level rising, flooding and drought will be hosted by the Washington State University Adaptive Water Urbanism Initiative Jan. 27-29. » More …

Computer models find ancient solutions to modern problems

WSU scientists use data from archaeological sites like the 1,200-year-old Pueblo Bonito in Chaco Canyon, N.M., to study how ancient peoples adapted to climate change in the American Southwest. (Photo by Nate Crabtree)

By Will Ferguson, College of Arts & Sciences

PULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University archaeologists are at the helm of new research using sophisticated computer technology to learn how past societies responded to climate change. » More …

Research: Arctic’s role as climate moderator threatened

Arctic ice research. (Photo by Paul Dodd)

By Eric Sorensen, WSU science writer

Von Walden

SAN FRANCISCO – Scientists in a rare and sometimes dangerous study of the Arctic have found that the region’s thinning sea ice is more prone to melting and storms, threatening its role as a moderator of the planet’s climate. » More …

Study finds life under lake ice complex, surprisingly active

By Eric Sorensen, WSU science writer

stephanie-hampton-80PULLMAN, Wash. – As long as ecologists have studied temperate lakes, the winter has been their off-season. It’s difficult, even dangerous, to look under the ice, and they figured plants, animals and algae weren’t doing much in the dark and cold anyway. » More …

Nov. 15: Commissioner to talk about state’s public lands

By Seth Truscott, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

GoldmarkPULLMAN, Wash. – A call to those who live in Washington to take action to protect and conserve its natural heritage will be part of a presentation by the state commissioner of public lands at noon Tuesday, Nov. 15, in Bryan Hall 308. Pizza and soda will be served. » More …

Oct. 18-20: Speakers consider negative ads, water, carbon tax

smear-campaignPULLMAN, Wash. – Negative campaigning, climate change and Washington’s carbon tax voter initiative are the topics of free, public presentations hosted by the Foley Institute for Public Policy and Public Service next at Washington State University. » More …

$3M grant for Columbia basin food, energy, water needs

the-columbia-river-below-wanapum-dam-web

By Tina Hilding, Voiland College of Engineering & Architecture

PULLMAN, Wash. – A team led by Washington State University will study how to better coordinate and manage the food, water and energy needs of the Columbia River basin and make the region more resilient to a changing climate as part of a $3 million grant cosponsored between the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture. » More …

Modeling maps vegetation to monitor erosion, rising seas

By Will Ferguson, College of Arts & Sciences

stephen-hendersonVANCOUVER, Wash. – Washington State University scientists Stephen Henderson and Nikolay Strigul have developed a computer model that uses photographs to recreate the complex geometry of coastal plants. » More …

Sept. 22-24: Public invited to help plan for sea level rise

By Scott Weybright, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

hope-hui-risingSEATTLE – Community workshops to design a “blue greenway” to help the South Park and Georgetown neighborhoods adapt to rising tides associated with climate change will be held Sept. 22-24 at Seattle Community College’s Georgetown campus in C222. » More …