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WSU News butterflies

Monarch butterflies disappearing from western North America

By Eric Sorensen, WSU News

VANCOUVER, Wash. – Monarch butterfly populations from western North America have declined far more dramatically than was previously known and face a greater risk of extinction than eastern monarchs, according to a new study in the journal Biological Conservation. » More …

Vineyard natural habitats assist with butterfly comeback

By Scott Weybright, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

Monarch-butterfly-web

PROSSER, Wash. – Washington wine grape vineyards experimenting with sustainable pest management systems are seeing an unexpected benefit: an increase in butterflies. » More …

‘Butterfly Wranglers’ tapped by wine industry

Tagged Monarch butterfly

A Monarch butterfly tagged with a Washington State University sticker. Entomologist David James is using the tags to track Monarch butterfly migration from the Pacific Northwest. Photo by David James.

 

WALLA WALLA, Wash. – When a young girl named Rosie found a Monarch butterfly resting on the garage door of her house in Bolinas, Calif., last year, she noticed it had a small, white tag on its wing with a Washington State University e-mail address and an identification number.

She sent a message to WSU entomologist David James, and he recorded … » More …

Blazing a trail with butterflies

Keen on conservation biology, grad student Cheryl Schultz 15 years ago began investigating whether habitat corridors were needed for the survival of an Oregon butterfly.

Today Schultz is the acknowledged authority in the Pacific Northwest on butterfly conservation. An assistant professor in the School of Biological Sciences at WSU Vancouver, she built her reputation and her expertise through a series of 35 modest grants from a variety of governmental agencies and conservation groups. 

With her knowledge and experience, Schultz can advise land managers trying to balance the need to preserve rare species with the growing pressures to … » More …

Blazing a trail with butterflies

Keen on conservation biology, grad student Cheryl Schultz 15 years ago began investigating whether habitat corridors were needed for the survival of an Oregon butterfly.

Today Schultz is the acknowledged authority in the Pacific Northwest on butterfly conservation. An assistant professor in the School of Biological Sciences at WSU Vancouver, she built her reputation and her expertise through a series of 35 modest grants from a variety of governmental agencies and conservation groups. 

With her knowledge and experience, Schultz can advise land managers trying to balance the need to preserve rare species with the growing pressures to … » More …

Butterflies focus of $50,000 study

Washington State University Vancouver has received a $50,000 science fund to focus on the ecology and conservation of Northwest butterflies and their prairie habitats.Officially titled the “WSU Vancouver Science Fund for Ecology and Conservation of Northwest Butterflies and Their Habitats,” the fund was donated by Stuart and Sharon Shultz. “It is our hope and expectation that the funding we provide will help the university conduct research that will become a magnet for additional grants that will help establish WSU Vancouver as a nationally recognized center for ecological research,” said Stuart and Sharon Shultz.Current conservation activities at WSU Vancouver focus on at-risk butterfly species, such as … » More …