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WSU News soil

Huge carbon sink exists in soil minerals WSU researcher finds

By Eric Sorensen, WSU News

Marc-Kramer-wsu environment chemistry
Kramer

VANCOUVER, Wash. – A Washington State University researcher has discovered that vast amounts of carbon can be stored by soil minerals more than a foot below the surface. The finding could help offset the rising greenhouse-gas emissions helping warm the Earth’s climate. » More …

Oct. 19: Growing Groceries series starts with good soil

By Kate Ryan, WSU Extension

tomatoes-80pEVERETT, Wash. – The Growing Groceries garden education series will start with home soil sample analysis at 7-9:30 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 19, in the Washington State University Snohomish County Extension Cougar Auditorium in McCollum Park, 600 128th St. SE, Everett. » More …

June 22: How healthy soil improves yields, ecosystem

By Seth Truscott, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

Farm-tourPULLMAN, Wash. – Experts from the U.S. Department of Agriculture at Washington State University will share the latest research on how soil health can improve farm profitability at the Cook Agronomy Farm Field Day Wednesday, June 22, in Whitman County, Wash. » More …

Sept. 30: Series on growing food starts with soil

soilEVERETT, Wash. – The Growing Groceries series of 10 extension gardening classes starts Sept. 30 and Nov. 11 with soil health and fertility. Participants who bring a soil sample to the first class will discuss lab results at the second class. » More …

Fulbright winner will improve rice by decontaminating soil

By Amy Veneziano, Undergraduate Education

PatrickFreeze-webPULLMAN, Wash. – Having studied soil contamination and its effect on food sources worldwide, it seems fitting that Ph.D. student Patrick Freeze of Washington State University should win a Fulbright grant during the United Nations International Year of Soil. » More …

Study: Conserving soil and water in dryland wheat region

By Sylvia Kantor, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

tillage-80LIND, Wash. – In the world’s driest rainfed wheat region, Washington State University researchers have identified summer fallow management practices that can make all the difference for farmers, water and soil conservation, and air quality. » More …