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Oct. 24, 25, 26: Space industry networks, recruits
October 17, 2016

cougs-in-spacePULLMAN, Wash. – Representatives from three aerospace companies will promote career opportunities and faculty collaboration Monday-Wednesday, Oct. 24-26, at free, public events at Washington State University. Students interested in a career in the space industry are encouraged to bring copies of their resumes.

Lenticular clouds – the truth is out there
September 14, 2016

By Nic Loyd, WSU meteorologist, and Linda Weiford, WSU News

weathercatch(2) (2)SPOKANE, Wash. – A cloud type that spawns tall tales almost as much as Sasquatch is known to linger over peaks in the Cascade Range. Sometimes called “UFO clouds,” these saucer-shaped formations are likely to become more prominent as we enter autumn and winter.

If life can make it here, it can make it anywhere
July 11, 2016

By Will Ferguson, College of Arts & Sciences

Dirk Schulze-MakuchPULLMAN, Wash. – If the origin of life is common on other worlds, the universe should be a cosmic zoo full of complex multicellular organisms.

WSU researchers share in ‘Breakthrough Prize’
May 3, 2016

PULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University researchers and adjunct faculty are among the scientists and engineers chosen to receive the coveted “Breakthrough Prize” for their role in the detection of gravitational waves 100 years after Albert Einstein predicted them.

Ask Dr. Universe: What is the Kuiper Belt?
May 3, 2016

Dr-Universe-230PULLMAN, Wash. – You might say the Kuiper Belt is the frozen frontier of our solar system. Out beyond Neptune’s chilly orbit, this saucer-shaped region is home to Pluto, billions of comets, and other icy worlds.

NASA funds student’s study of fueling space exploration
May 2, 2016

By Michelle Fredrickson, Voiland College of Engineering & Architecture

Carl-Bunge-mugPULLMAN, Wash. – When mechanical engineering student Carl Bunge was 3 years old, his brother and sister convinced him he was an alien born from an egg his parents found in a field.

Ask Dr. Universe: Can you hear in space?
January 19, 2016

Dr-Universe-230VANCOUVER, Wash. – Your question reminds me of an experiment: You put a ringing alarm clock in a jar and use a hose to slowly suck out all the air. As the air escapes, the ringing gets quieter until there’s no sound at all.