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Single hair shows researchers what a bear has been eating
July 28, 2015

By Eric Sorensen, WSU science writer

Grizzly-80PULLMAN, Wash. – U.S. and Canadian researchers have found they can get a good idea of a grizzly bear’s diet over several months by looking at a single hair. The technique, which measures residues of trace metals, can be a major tool in determining if the threatened animals are getting enough of the right foods to eat.

Chill grizzly bears, chill
June 29, 2015

Text and photos by Linda Weiford, WSU News

PULLMAN, Wash. – Giant ice cubes and fruit-flavored ice pops helped grizzly bears beat the heat yesterday at Washington State University’s Bear Research Education and Conservation Center as the mercury topped 104 degrees.

WSU’s grizzly bears lose weight on Thanksgiving?
November 24, 2014

By Linda Weiford, WSU News

Lynne-NelsonPULLMAN, Wash. – If you think Thanksgiving dinner can pack on the pounds, consider the grizzly bears at Washington State University that eat the equivalent of three such feasts daily during the weeks leading to hibernation. After nearly doubling their weight, they take a winter-long nap – only to wake up trim and perfectly healthy in early spring.

Rock Doc column: Smarter than your average bear
September 9, 2014

By E. Kirsten Peters, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

peters-e-k-2010-80PULLMAN, Wash. – Alex Waroff had a fantastic summer job. The veterinary student at Washington State University worked with faculty members as they tested just how clever grizzly bears are. What’s at issue is the use of tools.

Grizzly bears use tools? WSU study under way
August 19, 2014

By Linda Weiford, WSU News     

Roan-gets-donut-150PULLMAN, Wash. – In a first-ever study, researchers at Washington State University are examining whether grizzly bears make and use tools. And while it’s too soon to reach a broad scientific conclusion, at least one female bear is demonstrating that, yes, she definitely can.

WSU’s grizzly bears love pastries, delight visitors
May 19, 2014

By Linda Weiford, WSU News

Bear-80PULLMAN, Wash. – Wide-eyed children and adults are turning out in high numbers to view the grizzlies at Washington State University’s Bear Research, Education and Conservation Center on the east edge of campus. The giant predators take dips in the steel pool, roll on the grass and smack their massive paws at each other within the two-acre enclosure.

Rock Doc: Grizzly bear research might help human medicine
April 15, 2014

By E. Kirsten Peters, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

peters-e-k-2010-80PULLMAN, Wash. – I’ve gained 5 pounds since last summer. My body mass index is still fine, but I need to stop gaining to keep it that way.

Heidi Keen memorial fund to benefit animal research
August 15, 2013

Heidi KeenPULLMAN, Wash. – Heidi Keen, 32, a Washington State University doctoral student who was passionate about enriching the lives of animals in captivity, passed away on Friday, Aug. 9, after a brief illness.

A Palouse, Wash., resident and student in the animal sciences department in the College of Agricultural, Human and Natural Resource Sciences, Keen focused her doctoral studies at the WSU Bear Center, which she chose based on its mission to provide research, information and understanding to conserve bear populations worldwide.

She contributed to the field of zoology by designing activities that revealed the … » More …

Return of wolves aids grizzly bears in Yellowstone
July 30, 2013

Yellowstone grizzly

Grizzly bear in Yellowstone. (Photo courtesy
of Yellowstone National Park)

PULLMAN, Wash. – A new study suggests that the return of wolves to Yellowstone National Park is increasing a key part of the grizzly bear diet – berries that help bears put on fat before going into hibernation. Wolves reduce the number of elk, which eat the berry bushes.

The study was published this week by scientists from Washington State University and Oregon State University in the Journal of Animal Ecology. WSU co-authors are graduate assistant Jennifer K. Fortin and Charles T. Robbins, professor in the … » More …