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Research finds lethal wolf control backfires on livestock
December 3, 2014

By Eric Sorensen, WSU science writer

wolfPULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University researchers have found that it is counter-productive to kill wolves to keep them from preying on livestock. Shooting and trapping lead to more dead sheep and cattle the following year, not fewer.

Return of wolves aids grizzly bears in Yellowstone
July 30, 2013

Yellowstone grizzly

Grizzly bear in Yellowstone. (Photo courtesy
of Yellowstone National Park)

PULLMAN, Wash. – A new study suggests that the return of wolves to Yellowstone National Park is increasing a key part of the grizzly bear diet – berries that help bears put on fat before going into hibernation. Wolves reduce the number of elk, which eat the berry bushes.

The study was published this week by scientists from Washington State University and Oregon State University in the Journal of Animal Ecology. WSU co-authors are graduate assistant Jennifer K. Fortin and Charles T. Robbins, professor in the … » More …

From wolves to foxes to man’s best friend
July 2, 2013

PULLMAN, Wash. – When I get home from work I like to blow off a little bit of steam by playing with my dog, Buster Brown.

Buster came from the dog pound so I don’t know his full life history, but he’s about 10 years old. Despite his membership in the canine branch of the AARP, Buster still likes to play like a puppy. He’s a thoroughly domesticated dog, behaving in some ways like he’s 10 weeks old rather than 10 years old.

Breeding tameness in foxes

People have long speculated about how the ancestors of dogs – wolves – were coaxed into … » More …