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WSU News sleep

‘Sleep gene’ offers clues about why we need our zzzs

By Eric Sorensen, WSU science writer

Jason GerstnerSPOKANE, Wash. – Washington State University researchers have seen how a particular gene is involved in the quality of sleep experienced by three different animals, including humans. The gene and its function open a new avenue for scientists exploring how sleep works and why animals need it so badly. » More …

March 30-31: Symposium features updates on police culture

SPOKANE, Wash. – “Changing Police Culture” is the theme of a March 30-31 symposium on the Washington State University Spokane campus with presentations ranging from stress and suicide to sleep and performance to how research in the field has affected police training, policies and practice. » More …

New study to investigate role of sleep in chronic pain

By Judith Van Dongen, WSU Spokane

marian-wilson-webSPOKANE, Wash. – Washington State University will lead a study to understand the relationship between sleep and chronic pain, part of a nationwide effort to address the rising abuse of opioid pain relievers and expand the arsenal of non-drug treatment options. » More …

Sept. 14: Top circadian biology researcher to speak

By Doug Nadvornick, College of Medical Sciences

TurekSPOKANE, Wash. – For 40 years, Northwestern University biology professor Fred Turek has investigated circadian rhythms – internal cycles that tell our bodies when to sleep, eat and work. Interrupted rhythms can lead to chronic fatigue and health problems, such as obesity. » More …

Shifting sleep cycle affects sleep quality, immune response

By Eric Sorensen, WSU science writer

KaratsoreosPULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University researchers have found that the timing of an animal’s sleep can be just as important as how much sleeps it gets. » More …

REM sleep critical for young brains; medication interferes

By Rebecca Phillips, University Communications

FrankSPOKANE, Wash. – Rapid eye movement or REM sleep actively converts waking experiences into lasting memories and abilities in young brains, reports a new study from Washington State University Spokane. » More …

Researchers isolate smallest unit of sleep to date

By Rebecca Phillips, University Communications science writer

Krueger-James-Aug2012SPOKANE, Wash. – Washington State University Spokane scientists have grown a tiny group of brain cells that can be induced to fall asleep, wake up and even show rebound sleep after “staying up late.” » More …