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WSU News brain

Computer approaches human skill for first time in brain challenge

By Tina Hilding, Voiland College of Engineering and Architecture

Ji Shuiwang
Shuiwang

PULLMAN, Wash. – A WSU research team for the first time has developed a computer algorithm that is nearly as accurate as people are at mapping brain neural networks — a breakthrough that could speed up the image analysis that researchers use to understand brain circuitry. » More …

Ask Dr. Universe: Do animals help our minds?

PULLMAN, Wash. – Our brains are pretty busy. They are constantly thinking, feeling and sensing our world. One thing that can help some people relax is spending time with an animal friend. You might play fetch with a dog, sit with a cat, brush a horse or even watch a goldfish zip around its bowl. » More …

Grant to study cognitive health in elderly American Indians

Buchwald-webSPOKANE, Wash. – Researchers at Washington State University Health Sciences Spokane recently were awarded a $3.655 million four-year grant from the National Institute on Aging to study cognitive health among elderly American Indians. » More …

Nasal spray may ease Parkinson’s, other disease symptoms

By Lori Maricle, College of Pharmacy

Jeannie-PadowskiSPOKANE, Wash. – Researchers have reported a 240 percent increase in the brain of the antioxidant glutathione after it is administered via nasal spray. Glutathione deficiency has been documented in a variety of central nervous system disorders, including Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis, autism, Alzheimer’s disease, schizophrenia and bipolar disease. » More …

WSU searches for brain drugs to fight ALS, Alzheimer’s, more

By Lori Maricle, College of Pharmacy

travis-dentonSPOKANE, Wash. – Repairing the brain’s “house-cleaning function,” which could help people with Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and 100 other diseases, is the focus of recently funded research at Washington State University. » More …

REM sleep critical for young brains; medication interferes

By Rebecca Phillips, University Communications

FrankSPOKANE, Wash. – Rapid eye movement or REM sleep actively converts waking experiences into lasting memories and abilities in young brains, reports a new study from Washington State University Spokane. » More …