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Magnuson to be honored with lifetime service award
March 23, 2017

PULLMAN, Wash. – Nancy Magnuson, emeritus professor in the School of Molecular Biosciences, will receive the Lane V. Rawlins President’s Award for Distinguished Lifetime Service during the annual Celebrating Excellence Recognition Banquet on Friday, March 31, part of Washington State University’s annual Showcase celebration of faculty, staff and student excellence.

Science: Inside the global campaign to get rid of rabies
January 25, 2017

PULLMAN, Wash. – Rabies vaccine work by professors Thumbi Mwangi and Felix Lankester to address the problem of infectious diseases crossing borders in Kenya, Tanzania and throughout Africa is part of a comprehensive article in the recent issue of Science magazine.

Jan. 20 reception: Animal art exhibit runs through May
January 19, 2017

By Nella Letizia, WSU Libraries

PULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University veterinary student Zena Hemmen painted a tribute to the victims of one of the country’s most horrific animal massacres. Called “49 Lives,” the painting shows exotic animals like those killed in 2011 in Zanesville, Ohio.

Veterinary prof a fellow of National Academy of Inventors
December 13, 2016

PULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University professor Katrina L. Mealey has been elected a fellow of the National Academy of Inventors – a prestigious group of scientists that includes 27 Nobel laureates.

Four WSU faculty members elected to AAAS
November 22, 2016

WASHINGTON – Four Washington State University faculty have been named fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Aug. 10 reception: Photo exhibit features animals of Japan
August 2, 2016

By Nella Letizia, WSU Libraries

PULLMAN, Wash. – While her husband was stationed in Okinawa, Japan, three years ago, Heather Wiegmann photographed a Japanese white-eye, or mejiro, amid the first cherry blossoms of spring.

Research finds some gut bacteria resist malaria parasite
February 17, 2016

By Charlie Powell, College of Veterinary Medicine

Nicolas-VillarinoPULLMAN, Wash. – Microorganisms living in a person’s gut play a key role in how that individual may be affected by the malaria parasite, according to studies led by a Washington State University researcher.