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A win-win for farmers and slowing climate change
August 15, 2016

By Scott Weybright, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

Bill-Pan-80PULLMAN, Wash. – Climate change is already transforming agriculture in Washington. To help farmers deal with climate change, Bill Pan, a Washington State University professor of crop and soil sciences, is talking to them about ways to both adapt to changes and slow them down.

Ask Dr. Universe: How do plants hold dirt?
May 24, 2016

Dr-Universe-230PULLMAN, Wash. – The other day, I wandered into a Washington State University greenhouse and ran into my friend Mechthild Tegeder, a professor and expert on plants.

Prof wins national award for agriculture service overseas
May 11, 2016

Michael-SwanPULLMAN, Wash. – Michael Swan, emeritus professor in crop and soil sciences at Washington State University, is one of 125 national recipients of the President’s Volunteer Service Award from nonprofit organization Winrock International.

Hope for saving salmon lies in reducing stormwater pollution
April 12, 2016

innovators-salmon-webSEATTLE, Wash. – Salmon exposed to toxic stormwater can die in a matter of hours. But preliminary new findings by Washington State University researchers suggest that bioretention systems, such as rain gardens, that filter out contaminants from stormwater runoff are key for preventing lethal impacts on fish.

Scientists publish case study for growing food on Mars
October 20, 2015

By Eric Sorensen, WSU science writer

MartianPULLMAN, Wash. – Scientists at Washington State University and the University of Idaho are helping students figure out how to farm on Mars, much like astronaut Mark Watney, played by Matt Damon, attempts in the critically acclaimed movie “The Martian.”

Sept. 30: Series on growing food starts with soil
September 28, 2015

soilEVERETT, Wash. – The Growing Groceries series of 10 extension gardening classes starts Sept. 30 and Nov. 11 with soil health and fertility. Participants who bring a soil sample to the first class will discuss lab results at the second class.

‘A quiet crisis’: The rise of acidic soil in Washington
August 17, 2015

dayn-wheat-300DAYTON, Wash. – Gary Wegner first noticed the problem in 1991, when a field on his family’s farm west of Spokane produced one-fourth the usual amount of wheat. Lab tests revealed a surprising result: the soil had become acidic.