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WSU News Soil Sciences

$1.5M for specialty crop research to improve fruits, vegetables, farming

By Seth Truscott, College of Agricultural, Human and Natural Resource Sciences

usda looPULLMAN, Wash. – Seven research teams at Washington State University will enhance the competitiveness of Pacific Northwest crops by fighting devastating diseases and advancing sustainable agriculture, thanks to more than $1.5 million in Specialty Crop Block Grant funds from the Washington state and the U.S. Departments of Agriculture. » More …

Oct. 18: Series starts on growing your own groceries

By Kate Ryan, WSU Snohomish County Extension

lush gardenEVERETT, Wash. – Growing your own healthy, sustainable food — whether on an apartment deck or on many acres — is the focus of the 10-class Growing Groceries series that starts Oct. 18 at the Washington State University Snohomish County Extension Cougar Auditorium, 600 128th St. SE, Everett, inside McCollum Park. » More …

Vineyard, WSU scientists team up to battle orchard virus threat

healthy vs infected grapesBy Seth Truscott, College of Agricultural, Human and Resource Sciences

WAPATO, Wash. – Something in the soil was destroying Andrew Schultz’ grapevines. » More …

Drought-resistant wheat, soybeans WSU’s aim in USDA grant research

WSU researchers Andrei Smertenko - Mechthild Tegeder
Smertenko, Tegeder (l-r)

By Seth Truscott, WSU College of Agricultural, Human and Natural Resource Sciences

PULLMAN, Wash. – Researchers at Washington State University seek to improve drought-resistant crops, thanks to more than $900,000 in funding from the USDA’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA). » More …

Driest wheat region breaks 100-year snow record – how’s the wheat?

Samantha Crow and Brian FodeBy Linda Weiford, WSU News

LIND, Wash. – The eastern Washington town of Lind broke a record this winter for having the longest streak of snow cover since employees at Washington State University’s Dryland Research Station started keeping records 100 years ago. » More …

Hoophouses give WSU organic farm an early launch

By Scott Weybright, CAHNRS Communicationspicking spinach

PULLMAN, Wash. — When you’re a teaching farm at a university, the winter and early spring months require creativity and innovation.

“There just isn’t much for students to do in the fields in the spring semester,” said Brad Jaeckel, manager of the Washington State University’s Eggert Family Organic Farm. “So using season extenders, like our hoophouses, is really valuable for them to get some hands-on experience.” » More …

Natural plant defense could help fight cancer, Alzheimer’s

By Seth Truscott, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

PULLMAN, Wash. – A natural defense that helps plants ward off insect predators, discovered at Washington State University, could lead to better crops and new treatments for cancer and Alzheimer’s disease. » More …

Ask Dr. Universe: Why do nonbiodegradables decay slowly?

PULLMAN, Wash. – It can take a really long time for some things to decay. If we buried an apple peel in the backyard, it might only take a few weeks to break down into the soil. But if we buried a plastic water bottle, it would probably still be there hundreds of years from now. » More …

Nov. 19: Workshop on making, applying great compost

compostCARNATION, Wash. – The benefits of compost are well known, but making and using it well takes some know-how and planning. A Washington State University Extension compost workshop will be 9 a.m.-noon Saturday, Nov. 19, at Oxbow Farm and Conservation Center, 10819 Carnation-Duvall Rd. NE, Carnation. » More …

Oct. 19: Growing Groceries series starts with good soil

By Kate Ryan, WSU Extension

tomatoes-80pEVERETT, Wash. – The Growing Groceries garden education series will start with home soil sample analysis at 7-9:30 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 19, in the Washington State University Snohomish County Extension Cougar Auditorium in McCollum Park, 600 128th St. SE, Everett. » More …