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WSU News potatoes

Food scientist breaks barriers, earns excellence scholarship

Shima Bibi By Seth Truscott, College of Agricultural, Human and Natural Resource Sciences

PULLMAN, Wash. – Shima Bibi is a pioneer and a scientist. From rural Pakistan to WSU Pullman, she is pursuing her passion for discovery, working to improve global health and help girls in her home country reach their potential. » More …

New potato varieties chosen for McDonald’s fries

By Scott Weybright, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

potatoesPULLMAN, Wash. – When it comes to potatoes, french fries are the big outlet for Columbia Basin farmers. And when it comes to selling french fries, McDonald’s is the holy grail. » More …

Want fries with that? Stealth potato virus threatens industry

By Sylvia Kantor, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

PULLMAN, Wash. – The next time you sink your teeth into a hot, crispy french fry, consider the threats that stand between you and this iconic food. Newly emerged viruses threaten the U.S. potato industry, including potatoes grown in Washington. » More …

Spud research lands WSU grad student $10,000

 

Rhett Spear and Mr. Potato Head

Mr. Potato Head celebrates with Rhett Spear, a Ph.D. horticulture student at Washington State University, who landed a $10,000 scholarship for his research on potatoes. Photo by Shelly Hanks, WSU Photo Services.

 

PULLMAN, Wash. – When Rhett Spear first saw the message emailed to him from Washington, D.C., he figured it was a scam.

Congratulations, it said. You have been awarded a $10,000 research scholarship from the National Potato Council.

“I e-mailed them back and asked them to verify it,” recalled Spear, a Ph.D. horticulture … » More …

Tiny tubers pack powerful punch nutritionally

PULLMAN – When it comes to nutritional value, baby potatoes are proving to far outstrip their adult counterparts, according to Roy Navarre, USDA Agricultural Research Service research geneticist and adjunct professor with Washington State University.

In preliminary trials at WSU’s potato research center here, Navarre and his team are harvesting 71 different varieties of potatoes at between seven and 10 weeks of growth. Phytonutrients such as folate, or Vitamin B9, and other antioxidants appear in much higher levels in baby tubers weighing around an ounce, Navarre said.

“One of our goals is to help restore the healthful image … » More …

Researcher seeks new uses for cull potatoes

A Washington State University scientist is trying to turn cull potatoes into a profitable byproduct for Washington potato growers.The state’s potato growers harvest about 5 million tons of potatoes every year. Nearly 15 percent of the potatoes, usually known as culls, end up as some form of feed or residual use by-product, according to Melvin Martin of the J.R. Simplot Company.Culls cannot be sold on the fresh market or processed into french fries or other potato products because they do not meet minimum size, grade or quality standards. Culls often are sent on for further processing, fed to cattle or added to compost piles. Potatoes … » More …

WSU researcher seeks new uses for cull potatoes

A Washington State University scientist is trying to turn cull potatoes into a profitable byproduct for Washington potato growers. The state’s potato growers harvest about 5 million tons of potatoes every year. Nearly 15 percent of the potatoes, usually known as culls, end up as some form of feed or residual use by-product, according to Melvin Martin of the J.R. Simplot Company. Culls cannot be sold on the fresh market or processed into french fries or other potato products because they do not meet minimum size, grade or quality standards. Culls often are sent on for further processing, fed to cattle or added to compost … » More …