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Researchers uncover secrets of destructive plant virus
December 19, 2013

By Kate Wilhite, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

Pappu,-80PULLMAN, Wash. – A Washington State University professor and a colleague from Australia have deciphered the inner workings of one of the world’s most destructive crop viruses.

Getting the fix on Nitrogen
October 22, 2008

Nitrogen is an essential nutrient for plant growth, but not all forms of nitrogen are usable by plants. Although Earth’s atmosphere is rich in nitrogen, the inert atmospheric gas is useless to most organisms.

 

Some plants, though, form symbiotic relationships with bacteria called rhizobia. In a complicated exchange of nutrients, rhizobia produce an abundance of nitrogen, making it available to the plant. Legumes, such as such as alfalfa, soybeans, chickpeas and lentils, are especially good at fixing nitrogen. Grown as cover crops in order to enrich soil, legumes are typically higher in protein than other crop plants, probably due to their symbiosis with … » More …

Experts offer multilevel bug defense
October 16, 2008

 


Photo: WSU Spokane Extension Master Gardeners Levi Strauss, left, Wayne Green and Brigitta ozefowski discuss a strategy for dealing with a caterpillar outbreak. (Photo courtesy of WSU Extension Spokane)


 


By Robert Frank, WSU Today

 

Spiders and beetles and flies. Oh my!

 

Eggs and bugs in my food! Oh yuk!

 

‘Tis fall, and along with a bounty of fresh fruit and vegetables, the autumn temperatures also can usher in a multitude of bugs and critters. These insects thrive in the surrounding fields, trees, soil and grass, … » More …

Honoring excellence
April 11, 2008

Hanu Pappu, associate professor and President Sam Smith Distinguished Professor in Plant Virology, has received a Fulbright Award for 2008-2009. He will lecture and do research at Alexandria University, Egypt.

• University Publishing’s printing facility has been awarded chain-of-custody certification from the Forest Stewardship Council. WSU is the first university in the nation to receive this certification. The nonprofit council encourages responsible, sustainable management of the world’s forests and their products.

Lab detects pests, trains young scientists
February 13, 2008

 

As genomics research unravels some of life’s complexities, laboratories like the new molecular lab at WSU Puyallup applies that knowledge to real-world problems.

 

For molecular geneticist Katie Coats, that means working with the WSDA and WSU Puyallup plant pathologist Gary Chastagner to understand the genetics of the exotic plant pathogen Phytophthora ramorum, the cause of sudden oak death. This fungus-like pathogen has killed more than a million oak trees in California and has been found in a number of Puget Sound nurseries. If uncontrolled, this pathogen can spread through air and water to other trees and plants in nurseries and into surrounding … » More …

Survey ranks WSU plant, animal scientists among top in nation
February 8, 2007

PULLMAN– Washington State University scientists conducting research on plants and animals are among the most productive in the nation, according to a survey measuring faculty scholarly productivity published recently in The Chronicle for Higher Education. WSU plant scientists were ranked the fifth most productive in the United States. WSU’s zoology program ranked No. 10 in the nation. The rankings place WSU plant scientists and zoologists in the very top tier of the approximately 7,300 doctoral programs around the country evaluated in the survey.  “This honor truly recognizes the breadth and depth of our plant science and zoology programs,” said James Petersen, WSU vice president for research. … » More …

Garden of readin’
April 28, 2006

Jade plants, ferns, Christmas cacti, philodendrons, dieffenbachias and hoyas line the windowsills of Fischer Agricultural Science Library at WSU Pullman, thanks to Rhonda Gaylord, Fischer’s library specialist and resident gardener.In a small library with limited staff, Gaylord’s job tasks are broad, including working at the circulation desk, processing reserve materials, checking in journals, overseeing binding and helping patrons with reference questions. Gaylord also has added her own task — caring for the 91 plants that call Fischer Library home.“Libraries can be intimidating places,” Gaylord said. “Plants give the library a soft, homey touch.”What began in 1990 as one plant donated to the library by a … » More …

Opening ceremonies slated for pathogen research facility
April 21, 2006

PUYALLUP, Wash. — Elected officials will join leaders of the state’s forest products, nursery and Christmas tree industries on Monday to tour and dedicate a new research biocontainment facility for plant pathogens at the WSU Puyallup Research and Extension Center.Ceremonies will be held on Monday, April 24, with tours of the isolation unit beginning at 1 p.m. and opening ceremonies beginning at 2 p.m. in the D.F. Almendinger Center on the Puyallup Center campus, 7612 Pioneer Way East.WSU financed and installed the $250,000 isolation facility to expedite research on Sudden Oak Death, a deadly and easily spread plant pathogen. The fungus-like pathogen was identified in … » More …