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WSU News cattle

Animal scientist John McNamara honored by Illinois ala mater 

mcnamara john PULLMAN, Wash. – John McNamara, a WSU emeritus professor of animal sciences, received the ACES Award of Merit and the Round Barn Society membership from his alma mater, the University of Illinois College of Agriculture, Consumer and Environmental Sciences. » More …

Vaccinating increases family wealth, girls’ education

By Marcia Hill Gossard, College of Veterinary Medicine

PULLMAN, Wash. – A Washington State University-led research team found households in rural Africa that vaccinate their cattle for East Coast fever increased their income and spent the additional money on food and education. Researchers also found that when fewer cattle died from the fever, girls were more likely to attend secondary school. » More …

Licensing deal will help Genus combat deadly cattle disease

srikumaran-s-2010-80PULLMAN, Wash. – A gene editing technology developed at Washington State University is being licensed to Genus plc, a global animal genetics company, to develop cattle that are more resistant to bovine respiratory disease (BRD). » More …

Cattle killer: two parasites are better than one

Thumbi-80

PULLMAN, WASH. – When calves are infected by two parasite species at the same time, one parasite renders the other far less deadly, according to a new study published in the journal of Science Advances. » More …

Cattle could protect butterflies, conserve prairies

By Sylvia Kantor, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

Taylors_checkerspot_butterfly-80OLYMPIA, Wash. – Carefully managed cattle grazing can improve weed control, plant health and plant diversity on native prairies, according to anecdotal evidence. However, no systematic study has attempted to track the impacts of managed grazing on native prairie plant communities in western Washington – until now. » More …

Jan. 25: Registration open for Country Living Expo

By Kate Wilhite, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

cattlemen's-winterschool-logo-250STANWOOD, Wash. — The Country Living Expo and Cattlemen’s Winterschool will offer more than 175 workshops and classes in skills from cheesemaking and beekeeping to agribusiness, landscape design and small-scale solar power. » More …

More beef, less environmental impact

 

 

PULLMAN – Advances in productivity over the past 30 years have reduced the carbon footprint and overall environmental impact of U.S. beef production, according to a new study presented today by a WSU researcher.

 


Capper

In “Comparing the environmental impact of the US beef industry in 1977 to 2007,” assistant professor of animal science Jude L. Capper revealed that improvements in nutrition, management, growth rate and slaughter weights, have significantly reduced the environmental impact of modern beef production and improved its sustainability.

 

Challenging misconceptions

“These … » More …

Right time, place grazing key to sustainability

Cattle grazing. Photo by istockphoto.com

 

 

PULLMAN – Having the right number of cattle on the right piece of land for the right amount of time for the right reasons might be a powerful farming tool for ensuring the long-term sustainability – both economic and environmental – of their operations, according to Donald D. Nelson, Extension beef specialist in the WSU department of animal sciences.

 

“This is a major paradigm shift,” said Nelson. “We are using grazing as a tool to create a desirable future landscape and sustainable ecosystems. Planned grazing mimics natural cycles, which typically are … » More …

Increased productivity shrinks carbon footprint of cattle

PULLMAN – Discussion of the environmental impact of animal agriculture is very different when discussed in terms of productivity instead of individual animals, according to one of the newest members of the WSU Department of Animal Sciences.

 


Capper

“You can’t just talk about ‘the cow,’” said Jude Capper, assistant professor of animal science. “We have to think about it on an output basis, whether it’s milk, beef, pork or poultry. From 1944 to 2007, the carbon footprint of the cow has doubled, but during that same time period, the carbon footprint per gallon of milk has … » More …