Media advisory: WSU provost to don a ‘bee beard’

bee-facility

What: Washington State University is helping restore bee populations through its bee and pollinator program, which seeks to build a Bee and Pollinator Research Center on the Pullman campus.

As part of an event promoting that campaign, WSU entomologists and beekeepers will apply bee pheromones to Provost (former Interim President) Dan Bernardo’s face to attract honey bees from a nearby hive.

new-bee-facility
Images show plans for WSU pollinator research center.

Photo/interview opportunities: The beard building process should take approximately 10 minutes. Bernardo and other faculty members will be available for interviews about research at WSU to ensure the future of bees and pollinators.

Honey made by WSU bees will be available for purchase.

When: Friday, June 17, at 2 p.m.

Where: The front lawn of the Lewis Alumni Centre on the WSU Pullman campus, near the corner of Wilson Road and Lincoln Drive.

Special notes: Bees are highly sensitive to cologne and scented body wash or lotions. Bees also do not respond well to dark clothing colors, so wearing light colors is advised.

 

Contact:
Scott Weybright, WSU CAHNRS communications, 509-335-2967, scott.weybright@wsu.edu

 

 

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