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Undergrads display their year of research
April 19, 2004

Members of Washington State University’s undergraduate scholarly community will reveal their research findings during the Freshman Seminar Research Symposium Wednesday, April 21st from 5:00 pm to 8:30 pm on the 4th floor of the Center for Undergraduate Education (CUE).The researchers, all first-year students enrolled in the University’s Freshman Seminar Program, have worked under the mentorship of undergraduate and graduate students as well as teaching and library faculty. 11 seminars will participate in presenting their projects. These projects are a culmination of research and analysis and are presented using multimedia technologies. The Freshman Seminar Program’s excellence has received national acclaim. In Fall 2001, Freshman Seminar was … » More …

Undergraduate research focus of WSU symposium
April 15, 2004

The second annual Washington State University Psychology Undergraduate Research Symposium will be Thursday, April 15, and involve poster presentations by 11 student researchers.The lecture will begin at 3 p.m. in the Samuel H. Smith Center for Undergraduate Education, Room 203. Posters showcasing psychology undergraduate research projects will be available for viewing from 2-5 p.m. in the atrium of the Smith Center. Presenters will be on hand to answer questions about their research from 4-5 p.m. Research titles range from “Understanding text: Online inferences and memory operations after severe closed-head injury” to “Habituation: An investigation of the role of the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus.” “The … » More …

Provost approves 63 requests for professional leave
April 9, 2004

Sixty-three requests for professional leave in 2004-05 have been approved by Provost Robert C. Bates. He noted there will be no additional costs to WSU for this program. Here are the recipients divided by college.Agricultural, Human and Natural Resource Sciences• Preston K. Andrews, associate professor and associate horticulturist, August 2004-August 2005, to research and write a popular science/gardening book that compares natural and cultural histories of apples and roses. • John H. Bassman, professor and scientist, July 2004-June 2005, to collect field data to assess changes in flora and plant communities along the track of the Lewis and Clark Expedition. • Drew Lenore Betz, extension … » More …

Patents reward research, boost economic growth
April 9, 2004

There could be gold in that junk mail you threw out — or maybe a royalty check. Just ask Pat Moore, a scientist in the small fruit breeding program at WSU’s Puyallup Research and Extension Center. About to toss out an offer for expensive document framing, Moore realized the company was pitching it to him to frame his new patent. It was the first he’d heard that his raspberry, WSU 1090, had just been issued Washington State University’s most recent patent as of Feb. 10, 2004.WSU Puyallup began its raspberry breeding program in 1928 and has since released nine new varieties. However, WSU 1090, sold … » More …

More Research

Researcher receives grant to look at groundwater risks
March 9, 2004

Frank Loge, a Washington State University assistant professor of civil and environmental engineering, has received a $1.8 million grant from the Environmental Protection Agency to study the health risks associated with drinking groundwater from aquifers. When bacteria in drinking water sickened thousands and killed more than 100 people in the Milwaukee area in 1994, all the current regulations regarding safe drinking water were being followed. These and other incidents like it have led a WSU research group to investigate. For acute illnesses caused by pathogens, government regulations were developed and based on the success of treatment technologies. For instance, researchers found in a lab that … » More …

Nation’s decision makers learn about WSU strengths
February 23, 2004

Washington State University research will make the most of its time to shine in the national spotlight next week, as university representatives host a reception in Washington, D.C., and deliver federal requests to the state’s congressional delegation.“The purpose of the Feb. 24 reception is to communicate with those who influence opinions of many in D.C. about the significance that WSU research and scholarship have on the nation,” said Jim Petersen, vice provost for research. Those confirming plans to attend include lawmakers and corporate and federal agency representatives. Those attending will learn more about WSU research programs in which the federal government has significant interest, Petersen … » More …

Leading mad cow test developed in Pullman
February 20, 2004

It’s almost like a secret around the Palouse — not only was the nation’s first case of mad cow disease confirmed in a Washington State cow, but the test used to diagnose it is also produced in the region — in Pullman to be exact.Long before the holstein on the southeast Washington farm caused an international uproar last December, researchers at Washington State University had been diligently working on ways to better diagnose and understand the devastation caused by transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), a group of prion-induced diseases including bovine spongiform encephalopathy — BSE or mad cow disease. A prion is a protein particle similar … » More …

Spokane spinoff gets $6.5M
February 6, 2004

Washington State University recently announced the extension of its internationally recognized Institute for Shock Physics to Spokane.U.S. Rep. George Nethercutt joined university leaders and a Navy representative in Spokane on Jan. 30 to announce $6.5 million in grant funds from the Office of Naval Research. The money was set aside by Nethercutt in the 2004 defense budget.The money will support research to be conducted through the new Applied Sciences Laboratory, with operations in Spokane and Pullman. “Today demonstrates the power of a research university’s mission,” said WSU Provost Robert C. Bates. “Our faculty create knowledge the entire world values, right here in Washington and right … » More …

Research nets $400,000 for companies, universities
January 14, 2004

SEATTLE, Wash. — The Washington Technology Center awarded more than $400,000 in funding support to nine companies across the state to help support its research and development programs. Three of those involve Washington State University research efforts.Each year through its Research and Technology Development program, WTC awards more than $1 million to joint-research projects between university researchers and companies in Washington. This round of diverse projects supports advances in ceramic heating elements, the remote operation of unmanned aerial vehicles, radiographic imaging, environmentally-friendly plastic disposable food packaging, scanned beam displays, a diagnosis of bovine tuberculosis, composting from waste materials, ultrasonic power toothbrushes and drying fruit for … » More …

Research explores anti-DUI messages
December 12, 2003

Three health communication researchers in the Edward R. Murrow School of Communication are hoping to break new ground in the war on teenage drinking and driving, an issue the National Academy of Sciences and Institute of Medicine call a “largely invisible public health epidemic.”The research by professors Bruce E. Pinkleton, Erica Weintraub Austin and Paul Bolls is made possible through a recent grant from the Alcoholic Beverage Medical Research Foundation. The ABMRF describes itself as the largest independent, nonprofit foundation in North America devoted solely to supporting research on the effects of alcohol on health and behavior and the prevention of alcohol-related problems. With funding … » More …

Early indicators, verdict on Mission to DC
October 31, 2003

A year ago, James Petersen, then interim vice provost for research, began a program called Mission to DC — Washington, D.C. that is. Today, Petersen — a quiet, innovative, forceful, no-nonsense administrator — is officially the vice provost for research. The question is, what has Mission to DC accomplished and will it keep going? The thrust of the project is to take teams of WSU research faculty to the nation’s capital and have them meet with program managers from federal research agencies, foundations and corporations in the D.C. area. While there, they also meet with representatives from Washington’s congressional delegation. The goals are to increase … » More …

Research team lands $9.9M grant from NIH
October 31, 2003

The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, has awarded $9.9 million to a team of Washington State University researchers seeking ways to protect the safety of the nation’s food and water supply.The long-standing interdisciplinary group will conduct research and develop products to rapidly identify, prevent and treat food and waterborne disease agents, such as E. coli, listeria and salmonella. The funding comes as a direct result of more than a decade of the WSU group’s productivity in food safety funded by a broad spectrum of public and private agencies. Recently, this support also included the Washington … » More …

Variety reflects university breadth
October 17, 2003

The new federal Department of Homeland Security needs the research WSU can offer but has yet to organize much in the way of funding. When more money becomes available, however, WSU plans to be ready.“We’re already working in this area,” said Candis Claiborn, associate dean for Research and Graduate Studies for the College of Engineering and Architecture and point person for a group of WSU leaders identifying projects and collaborations that might attract homeland security money. “There’s very little funding yet” specifically from the federal department, Claiborn said. “But many other funding agencies are redirecting some of their resources to homeland security.” Various WSU projects … » More …

Research helps arthritic dogs
September 8, 2003

Veterinary arthritis researchers in Washington State University’s teaching hospital have launched three concurrent studies and are looking for dogs in need of humane, noninvasive care for arthritis.In return, veterinarians from the Comparative Orthopedic Research Laboratory will pay owners up to $600 for volunteering their animals and will provide up to eight months of free pet food and medications.Arthritis, obesity and hipsWSU veterinarians are trying to determine the effects of obesity on arthritis in dogs with chronic hip dysplasia, a common condition in which the hip joints in animals and (humans) do not form properly. After years of use, the joint can develop a painful arthritis.In … » More …

Farming field day slated
June 18, 2003

The 2nd Direct Seed and Precision Farming Research Field Day will be Thursday, June 26, at Washington State University’s Cunningham Agronomy Farm located northeast of Pullman. The 140-acre farm is a new long-term research site, managed since 1999 under continuous direct seeding with field-scale equipment. Research is focused on developing direct-seed cropping systems and precision-agriculture technologies for a “typical” Palouse landscape. More than 20 scientists are involved in the research, which is guided by a 12-member advisory committee of growers, scientists and representatives from agribusiness and agencies. A 90-acre portion of the farm has been intensively grid-sampled at 370 sites referenced to global positioning satellites … » More …

Petersen to head research
April 11, 2003

James Petersen, interim vice provost for research, professor of chemical engineering and associate dean for research and graduate programs in the College of Engineering and Architecture, has been named the vice provost for research.”I am very pleased that Jim has agreed to serve as vice provost for research,” said Provost Robert Bates. “In a very short time, as interim vice provost, he has measurably advanced the research agenda for the university through strong support for research faculty, and the creation of new opportunities and development of a number of new programs that will support individual and collaborative research. His strong support for research, demonstrated success … » More …

Four candidates selected for vice provost of research
February 21, 2003

Four candidates have been selected from a field of applicants for the vice provost of research position. Finalists include:• Neil C. Olson, associate dean for research at North Carolina State University. Olson earned his bachelor’s degree in veterinary medicine and doctor of veterinary medicine degree from University of Minnesota, and his Ph.D. in physiology from Michigan State University. Olson made his first on-campus appearance Jan. 18 – 19 for interviews and visitation. He gave his seminar and open presentation last Wednesday, Feb. 19, in Murrow 53 in Pullman, with live videostreaming.• Colin Guy Scanes, interim director of the Center for Designing Food to Improve Nutrition … » More …

Kicking research into gear
January 10, 2003

Get organized. Plan to work as a team and make advances. Prepare your agenda. And let’s roll — it’s time to hit Washington, D.C.!That plan was launched by Washington State University’s Office of Research last fall and now is well under way.