WSU News police

Oct. 21: Police chiefs discuss law enforcement, society

just-mercyPULLMAN, Wash. – Changes in law enforcement to meet societal needs and demands will be discussed by Pullman and Washington State University police chiefs at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 21, in CUE 203 at WSU. The free, public talk is tied to WSU’s common reading, “Just Mercy,” by Bryan Stevenson. » More …

Online media course enhances policeman’s career

By Darin Watkins, Edward R. Murrow College of Communication

Smith-80ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, Md. – It was a disturbing phone call for even the most seasoned of police officers. Hours after Fourth of July celebrations died down, someone abandoned a six-week-old baby girl in the middle of the road. » More …

July 28-29: Police partnership prompts training conference

By Lorraine Nelson, WSU Spokane

police-health-conferenceSPOKANE, Wash. – A conference for first responders and mental health professionals will be July 28-29 at Washington State University Spokane. » More …

Graduating detective enlists help from TRiO to succeed

By Maegan Murray, WSU Tri-Cities

Nunez-mugRICHLAND, Wash. – Jacinto “Jason” Nunez was able to make a successful life for himself and his family as a detective for the Franklin County Sheriff’s office, but he always felt something was missing. » More …

Criminologist takes on regional justice reform

By Adrian Aumen, College of Arts & Sciences

van-wormer-webSPOKANE, Wash. – A Washington State University faculty member is steering the first major steps in a comprehensive overhaul of the way Spokane area police, courts, judges and detention centers work together. » More …

April 3: Live stream panel discussion on race, policing

BlackBrownBlue-headVANCOUVER, Wash. – A free, public panel discussion, “Black, Brown and Blue: Diverse perspectives on race, policing and justice,” will be 1:30-3:30 p.m., Friday, April 3, at Washington State University Vancouver and live streamed at http://youtube.com/wsuvancouver. » More …

‘Deadly force’ lab finds racial disparities in shootings

By Eric Sorensen, WSU science writer

Lois-JamesSPOKANE, Wash. – Participants in an innovative Washington State University study of deadly force were more likely to feel threatened in scenarios involving black people. But when it came time to shoot, participants were biased in favor of black suspects, taking longer to pull the trigger against them than against armed white or Hispanic suspects. » More …