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WSU News archaeology

Computer models find ancient solutions to modern problems

WSU scientists use data from archaeological sites like the 1,200-year-old Pueblo Bonito in Chaco Canyon, N.M., to study how ancient peoples adapted to climate change in the American Southwest. (Photo by Nate Crabtree)

By Will Ferguson, College of Arts & Sciences

PULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University archaeologists are at the helm of new research using sophisticated computer technology to learn how past societies responded to climate change. » More …

Oct. 6: How archaeology aids modern resilience, sustainability

By Beverly Makhani, Undergraduate Education

jeremy-sabloff-webPULLMAN, Wash. – Anthropologist Jeremy A. Sabloff will discuss how archaeology can make a difference in today’s world at 5 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 6, in Todd Hall 276 at Washington State University. » More …

Class partners with tribe for authentic experience

By Maegan Murray, WSU Tri-Cities

MarceauRICHLAND, Wash. – Students got to dig deep in a Washington State University Tri-Cities class recently, exploring archaeology while uncovering authentic materials provided by local Native Americans. » More …

Study: How environment may have affected ancient societies

ancient-DNA-from-Photos-dot-comPULLMAN, Wash. – A new study in PLOS ONE shows for the first time that epigenetic marks on DNA can be detected in a large number of ancient human remains. This could improve understanding about the effects of famine and disease in the ancient world. » More …

Solving ancient mystery points to resource for warmer future

By Will Ferguson, College of Arts & Sciences

Guedes-80PULLMAN, Wash. – Climate change may be responsible for the abrupt collapse of civilization on the fringes of the Tibetan Plateau around 2000 B.C. » More …

Archaeologist earns award for research in American Southwest

By Will Ferguson, College of Arts & Sciences

Koehler-80PULLMAN, Wash. – Tim Kohler, regents professor of archaeology and evolutionary anthropology, fell in love with the pinion juniper forests and rugged terrain of the American Southwest’s Four Corners region almost 40 years ago. His research paints a vivid picture of what life was like for the area’s ancient inhabitants and helped unravel the causes behind its massive depopulation at the end of the 13th century. » More …

Sept. 2: Historian kicks off common reading series

Garbology-100PULLMAN, Wash. – “One Person’s Trash is Another’s Treasure: Historical Archaeology and the Study of Garbage,” a free, public presentation by history instructor Ken Faunce, will be at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 2, in CUE 203 at Washington State University. » More …

Daugherty dies; lead archaeologist of ‘Pompeii of America’

By Eric Sorensen, WSU News

Daugherty-80PULLMAN, Wash. – Richard Daugherty, a Washington State University archaeologist who led the excavation of the Ozette village site, “the Pompeii of America,” and numerous other key Northwest finds, died Saturday of bone cancer. He was 91. » More …

Rock Doc column: Ancient climate clues in tree rings

By E. Kirsten Peters, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

Peters-e-k-2010-80PULLMAN, Wash. – On a lark when I was a college student I took a class in field biology. It sounded romantic and I was young, so even though it didn’t really make sense for a geology student to take the senior level class in another discipline, I was there bright and early on the first day of the semester. » More …

Promising approach to ancient mystery gains global acclaim

By Adrian Aumen, College of Arts and Sciences

Kohler-by-Roger-Cozien-80PULLMAN, Wash. – Whatever caused tens of thousands of Pueblo farmers to suddenly leave their ancient homeland in southwestern Colorado in the late AD 1200s is one of the great mysteries in archaeology. Discoveries could aid understanding of contemporary societies. » More …