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WSU News tim kohler

Prehistoric turkey DNA used to track ancient Pueblo migration

By Will Ferguson, College of Arts and Sciences

Pueblo sitePULLMAN, Wash. – In the mid-to-late 1200s, some 30,000 ancestral pueblo farmers left their homes in southwestern Colorado’s Mesa Verde region and never returned. » More …

Archeology professor awarded grant

PULLMAN – WSU Regents Professor of Archeology Timothy Kohler will receive a grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the U.S. Forest Service to better understand the interactions between humans and their environment by studying coupled natural and human systems.

Kohler and his colleagues will receive a $1,499,172 grant to study the dynamic interaction between prehispanic Pueblo peoples and their environment. The project, entitled “Coupled Natural and Human Ecosystems over Long Periods: Pueblo Ecodynamics” is a collaborative effort between WSU, Crow Canyon Archaeological Center, the U.S. Forest Service, the National Park Service, and the … » More …

Proud of graduate involvement

When most people think of an archeological dig, they think of dirt, but some of Tim Kohler’s most productive digs are deep in data.Kohler, a 2006 Regents Professor best known for his archaeological research in the southwestern United States, has, in some ways, changed the face of archeology with his sophisticated computer analysis of voluminous data related to climate, geography, food sources and other factors that influence human settlements.“The whole process of research is fun because you are trying to produce new knowledge,” Kohler said. He said one way to do that is to manipulate large data sets in various ways, including through simulation, to … » More …