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WSU News pueblo

Prehistoric turkey DNA used to track ancient Pueblo migration

By Will Ferguson, College of Arts and Sciences

Pueblo sitePULLMAN, Wash. – In the mid-to-late 1200s, some 30,000 ancestral pueblo farmers left their homes in southwestern Colorado’s Mesa Verde region and never returned. » More …

Computer models find ancient solutions to modern problems

WSU scientists use data from archaeological sites like the 1,200-year-old Pueblo Bonito in Chaco Canyon, N.M., to study how ancient peoples adapted to climate change in the American Southwest. (Photo by Nate Crabtree)

By Will Ferguson, College of Arts & Sciences

PULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University archaeologists are at the helm of new research using sophisticated computer technology to learn how past societies responded to climate change. » More …

Researcher: Turkeys a major part of ancestral Pueblo life

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By Eric Sorensen, WSU science writer

Lipe-80PULLMAN, Wash. – While the popular notion of the American Thanksgiving is less than 400 years old, the turkey has been part of American lives for more than 2,000 years. But for much of that time, the bird was more revered than eaten. » More …

Researchers link climate changes, Pueblo social disruption

By Eric Sorensen, WSU science writer

PULLMAN, Wash. – The heavily studied yet largely unexplained disappearance of ancestral Pueblo people from southwest Colorado is “the most vexing and persistent question in Southwestern archaeology,” according to the New York Times.

But it’s not all that unique, say Washington State University scientists. » More …

Localized climate change contributed to ancient depopulation

By Eric Sorensen, WSU science writer

puebloPULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University researchers have detailed the role of localized climate change in one of the great mysteries of North American archaeology: the depopulation of southwest Colorado by ancestral Pueblo people in the late 1200s. » More …