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Study: How environment may have affected ancient societies
June 1, 2015

ancient-DNA-from-Photos-dot-comPULLMAN, Wash. – A new study in PLOS ONE shows for the first time that epigenetic marks on DNA can be detected in a large number of ancient human remains. This could improve understanding about the effects of famine and disease in the ancient world.

May 12: Tushingham to receive Libraries’ Excellence Award
May 8, 2015

By Nella Letizia, WSU Libraries

Shannon-Tushingham-mugPULLMAN, Wash. – Shannon Tushingham, assistant director of the Washington State University Museum of Anthropology, will receive the 2015 WSU Libraries’ Excellence Award during an 11 a.m. reception Tuesday, May 12, in the Terrell Library Atrium.

Through April: Elwha photos at anthropology museum
February 10, 2015

PULLMAN, Wash. – A photographic exhibit about the Elwha River on Washington’s Olympic Peninsula is on display for free to the public, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. through the semester in the Washington State University Museum of Anthropology in College Hall.

Rock Doc: Climate change and population collapse
December 30, 2014

By E. Kirsten Peters, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

peters-e-k-2010-80PULLMAN, Wash. – Climate is always changing. That’s one truth that stands out from the record around the world of natural samples of Earth materials, tree rings, ice layers and so much more. But how much has past climate change influenced human affairs?

Archaeologist earns award for research in American Southwest
December 15, 2014

By Will Ferguson, College of Arts & Sciences

Koehler-80PULLMAN, Wash. – Tim Kohler, regents professor of archaeology and evolutionary anthropology, fell in love with the pinion juniper forests and rugged terrain of the American Southwest’s Four Corners region almost 40 years ago. His research paints a vivid picture of what life was like for the area’s ancient inhabitants and helped unravel the causes behind its massive depopulation at the end of the 13th century.

WSU geneticist helps solve mystery of Arctic peoples
August 28, 2014

By Eric Sorensen, WSU science writer

omar cornejoPULLMAN, Wash. – With help from a Washington State University population geneticist, Danish researchers have concluded that North America and the Arctic were settled in at least three pulses of migration from Siberia. First came the ancestors of today’s Native Americans, then Paleo-Eskimos – the first to settle in the Arctic – followed by the ancestors of today’s Inuit.

Anthropologists aid in the Ebola epidemic
August 14, 2014

HewlettVANCOUVER, Wash. – Barry Hewlett, a medical anthropologist at Washington State University Vancouver, states that efforts to contain outbreaks such as Ebola must be “culturally sensitive and appropriate…otherwise people are running away from actual care that is intended to help them.”

WSU researchers see violent era in ancient Southwest
August 4, 2014

By Eric Sorensen, WSU science writer

KohlerPULLMAN, Wash. – It’s a given that, in numbers terms, the 20th century was the most violent in world history, with civil wars, purges and two world wars killing as many as 200 million people.

Rock Doc: An ancient American woman buried by the sea
July 8, 2014

By E. Kirsten Peters, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences 

peters-e-k-2010-80PULLMAN, Wash. – I need a cap on my front tooth redone – it has a significant chip. Luckily I live at a time when dentists are in every city and town, plying their trade in ways that can help us each day.