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WSU News Anthropology

Computer models find ancient solutions to modern problems

WSU scientists use data from archaeological sites like the 1,200-year-old Pueblo Bonito in Chaco Canyon, N.M., to study how ancient peoples adapted to climate change in the American Southwest. (Photo by Nate Crabtree)

By Will Ferguson, College of Arts & Sciences

PULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University archaeologists are at the helm of new research using sophisticated computer technology to learn how past societies responded to climate change. » More …

Researcher: Turkeys a major part of ancestral Pueblo life

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By Eric Sorensen, WSU science writer

Lipe-80PULLMAN, Wash. – While the popular notion of the American Thanksgiving is less than 400 years old, the turkey has been part of American lives for more than 2,000 years. But for much of that time, the bird was more revered than eaten. » More …

Oct. 6: How archaeology aids modern resilience, sustainability

By Beverly Makhani, Undergraduate Education

jeremy-sabloff-webPULLMAN, Wash. – Anthropologist Jeremy A. Sabloff will discuss how archaeology can make a difference in today’s world at 5 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 6, in Todd Hall 276 at Washington State University. » More …

Literacy education professor wins early career award

By Kyla Emme, College of Education intern

sarah-newcomerRICHLAND, Wash. – Sarah Newcomer, an assistant professor of literacy education at Washington State University Tri-Cities, recently earned a national award for her work to increase opportunity and equity in education. » More …

Through Sept. 17: Faculty art explores geometric tradition

 

By Debby Stinson, Museum of Art

PULLMAN, Wash. – A retrospective of works by retired Washington State University faculty member Chris Watts will run Aug. 22-Sept. 17 at the Museum of Art/WSU. An opening reception at 6 p.m. and artist talk at 7 p.m. will be Thursday, Aug. 25, in the museum gallery. Admission is free. » More …

Researchers link climate changes, Pueblo social disruption

By Eric Sorensen, WSU science writer

PULLMAN, Wash. – The heavily studied yet largely unexplained disappearance of ancestral Pueblo people from southwest Colorado is “the most vexing and persistent question in Southwestern archaeology,” according to the New York Times.

But it’s not all that unique, say Washington State University scientists. » More …

Study: Innate teaching skills ‘part of human nature’

By Eric Sorensen, WSU science writer

Hewlett-80VANCOUVER, Wash. – Some 40 years ago, Washington State University anthropologist Barry Hewlett noticed that when the Aka pygmies stopped to rest between hunts, parents would give their infants small axes, digging sticks and knives. » More …