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WSU researchers extract nicotine from ancient dental plaque for the first time
February 27, 2018

By Will Ferguson, College of Arts and Sciences

Woman Smoking PULLMAN, Wash. – A team of scientists including researchers from Washington State University has shown for the first time that nicotine residue can be extracted from plaque, also known as “dental calculus”, on the teeth of ancient tobacco users.

Researchers chart rising wealth inequality across millennia
November 15, 2017

The findings, published this week in the journal Nature, have profound implications for contemporary society, as inequality repeatedly leads to social disruption, even collapse, and the United States currently has one of the highest levels of inequality in the history of the world.

Colloquium: The Morals of mindfulness
October 25, 2017

Guest lecture on the development of conditions and characteristics of moral thinking about mindfulness in America, Oct. 27, 12:10-1 p.m.

Challenging widely accepted notions about cultural transmission
October 5, 2017

The process of communicating information is known among anthropologists as cultural transmission, and there was a time when it did not exist, when humans or more likely their smaller brained ancestors did not pass on knowledge. Luke Premo, an associate professor of anthropology, would like to know when that was. Writing in the October issue of Current Anthropology, he and three colleagues challenge a widely accepted notion that cultural transmission goes back more than 2 million years.

April 3: Chocolate, parrots and social interaction
March 28, 2017

PULLMAN, Wash. – The importance of cacao and macaws in trade and ritual in the ancient Southwest will be discussed by a visiting anthropologist at 4:10 p.m. Monday, April 3, in Todd Hall 130.

Computer models find ancient solutions to modern problems
December 20, 2016

By Will Ferguson, College of Arts & Sciences

PULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University archaeologists are at the helm of new research using sophisticated computer technology to learn how past societies responded to climate change.

Researcher: Turkeys a major part of ancestral Pueblo life
November 22, 2016

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By Eric Sorensen, WSU science writer

Lipe-80PULLMAN, Wash. – While the popular notion of the American Thanksgiving is less than 400 years old, the turkey has been part of American lives for more than 2,000 years. But for much of that time, the bird was more revered than eaten.