Through Sept. 17: Faculty art explores geometric tradition

 

By Debby Stinson, Museum of Art

PULLMAN, Wash. – A retrospective of works by retired Washington State University faculty member Chris Watts will run Aug. 22-Sept. 17 at the Museum of Art/WSU. An opening reception at 6 p.m. and artist talk at 7 p.m. will be Thursday, Aug. 25, in the museum gallery. Admission is free.

The museum’s tradition of presenting work by fine arts faculty, alternating annually between group shows and individual showcases, this year highlights Watts, who retired in 2015 after 27 years of teaching drawing and painting at WSU.

Citing influences as diverse as Bronze Age monuments, spirals and mazes, Pythagoras, counting processes, scientific structures, bell ringing, Theosophy and the geometric tradition in art, Watts pursues a long-term inquiry into systems of order, patterning and – to a certain degree – spiritual or esoteric ideas.

The Museum of Art is located on Wilson Road across from Martin Stadium in the Fine Arts Center on the WSU Pullman campus. Gallery hours are 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday-Saturday, open until 7 p.m. Thursday and closed Sunday.

For more information, visit https://museum.wsu.edu/events/exhibit/2016-fine-arts-faculty-focus-exhibition/ or contact the museum at 509-335-1910. The exhibit is funded by the Members of the Museum of Art and the Samuel H. and Patricia W. Smith Arts Endowment.

 

Contacts:
Debby Stinson, Museum of Art/WSU, 509-335-6282, debby_stinson@wsu.edu
Anna-Maria Shannon, Museum of Art/WSU, 509-335-6140, annamshannon@wsu.edu

 

 

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