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WSU News physics

‘Negative mass’ created at Washington State University

Michael Forbes WSU physicsBy Eric Sorensen, WSU science writer

PULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University physicists have created a fluid with negative mass, which is exactly what it sounds like. Push it, and unlike every physical object in the world we know, it doesn’t accelerate in the direction it was pushed. It accelerates backwards. » More …

New physics, astronomy chair starts Feb. 1

By Will Ferguson, College of Arts & Sciences

PULLMAN, Wash. – Brian Saam, an expert in experimental atomic physics, will become professor and chair of the Washington State University Department of Physics and Astronomy on Feb. 1. » More …

$1.1 million award funds solar technology advances

lynn-crystal-sample-2-webPULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University researchers have received a $1.1 million U.S. Department of Energy SunShot Initiative cooperative award to improve the performance and lower the cost of solar materials for the multibillion dollar industry. » More …

WSU researchers share in ‘Breakthrough Prize’

PULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University researchers and adjunct faculty are among the scientists and engineers chosen to receive the coveted “Breakthrough Prize” for their role in the detection of gravitational waves 100 years after Albert Einstein predicted them. » More …

March 24-25: Workshops, talk to improve teaching, learning

Eric-MazurPULLMAN, Wash. – A Harvard physicist who has achieved success as a pioneer of interactive learning will conduct three workshops for faculty March 24-25 and present a talk at noon Friday, March 25, in Abelson 201 at Washington State University. » More …

WSU physicists contribute to gravitational waves finding

PULLMAN, Wash. – For the first time, scientists have observed ripples in the fabric of space-time called gravitational waves, arriving at the earth from a cataclysmic event in the distant universe. This confirms a major prediction of Albert Einstein’s 1915 general theory of relativity and opens an unprecedented new window onto the cosmos. » More …

Flyin’ high: WSU flag launched into stratosphere

By Sabrina Zearott and Joanna Steward, College of Arts & Sciences

Coug-flag-200PULLMAN, Wash. – The Washington State University flag has flown in many places around the world – from ESPN Game Day to the Great Wall of China – and now more than 18 miles into the stratosphere. » More …